Landmarks in Linguistic Thought Volume III: The Arabic Linguistic Tradition by Kees VersteeghLandmarks in Linguistic Thought Volume III: The Arabic Linguistic Tradition by Kees Versteegh

Landmarks in Linguistic Thought Volume III: The Arabic Linguistic Tradition

byKees VersteeghEditorKees Versteegh

Paperback | June 2, 1997

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Landmarks in Linguistic Thought Vol 3is devoted to a linguistic tradition that lies outside the Western mainstream, namely that of the Middle East.
The reader is introduced to the major issues and themes that have determined the development of the Arabic linguistic tradition. Each chapter contains a short extract from a translated `landmark' text followed by a commentary which places the text in its social and intellectual context. The chosen texts frequently offer scope for comparison with the Western tradition. By contrasting the two systems, the Western and the Middle Eastern, this book serves to highlight the characteristics of two very different systems and thus stimulate new ideas about the history of linguistics.
This book presumes no prior knowledge of Arabo-Islamic culture and Arabic language, and is invaluable to anyone with an interest in the History of Linguistics. Kees Versteegh is currently Professor of Arabic and Islam at the Middle East Institute of the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. His publications includeThe Explanation of Linguistic Causes(1995),Ed.Arabic Outside the Arab World(1994)
Title:Landmarks in Linguistic Thought Volume III: The Arabic Linguistic TraditionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.6 inPublished:June 2, 1997Publisher:Taylor and Francis

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415157579

ISBN - 13:9780415157575

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The reader is introduced to the major issues and themes that have determined the development of the Arabic linguistic tradition. Each chapter contains a short extract from a translated 'landmark' text followed by a commentary which places the text in its social and intellectual context. The chosen texts frequently offer scope for comparison with the Western tradition. The book highlights the characteristics of a tradition outside the Western mainstream with an independent approach to the phenomenon of language and thus stimulates new ideas about the history of linguistics.