Landscapes of Conflict: The Oregon Story, 1940-2000 by William G. RobbinsLandscapes of Conflict: The Oregon Story, 1940-2000 by William G. Robbins

Landscapes of Conflict: The Oregon Story, 1940-2000

byWilliam G. RobbinsForeword byWilliam Cronon

Paperback | February 25, 2010

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Post-World War II Oregon was a place of optimism and growth, a spectacular natural region from ocean to high desert that seemingly provided opportunity in abundance. With the passing of time, however, Oregon?s citizens ? rural and urban ? would find themselves entangled in issues that they had little experience in resolving. The same trees that provided income to timber corporations, small mill owners, loggers, and many small towns in Oregon, also provided a dramatic landscape and a home to creatures at risk. The rivers whose harnessing created power for industries that helped sustain Oregon?s growth ? and were dumping grounds for municipal and industrial wastes ? also provided passageways to spawning grounds for fish, domestic water sources, and recreational space for everyday Oregonians.

The story of Oregon?s accommodation to these divergent interests is a divisive story between those interested in economic growth and perceived stability and citizens concerned with exercising good stewardship towards the state?s natural resources and preserving the state?s livability. In his second volume of Oregon?s environmental history, William Robbins addresses efforts by individuals and groups within and outside the state to resolve these conflicts. Among the people who have had roles in this process, journalists and politicians Richard Neuberger and Tom McCall left substantial legacies and demonstrated the ambiguities inherent in the issues they confronted.

William G. Robbins is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of History, Oregon State University. He is the author of Landscapes of Promise: The Oregon Story, 1800-1940, and Hard Times in Paradise: Coos Bay, Oregon, 1850-1986.
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Title:Landscapes of Conflict: The Oregon Story, 1940-2000Format:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:February 25, 2010Publisher:University of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295990430

ISBN - 13:9780295990439

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Table of Contents

Foreword: Still Searching for Eden at the End of the Oregon Trail by William CrononPrefacePrologue: A Time to RememberI. Postwar Promise1. The Great Hope for the New Order2. Into the Brave New WorldII. Making Agriculture Modern3. Bringing Perfection to the Fields4. The Wonder World of PesticidesIII. Industrial Forestry Management5. Planning and Technical Efficiency in the Forests6. Intensive Forestry and Citizen ActivismIV. Of Rivers and Land7. Richard Neuberger's Conservation Politics8. Tom McCall and the Struggle for the Willamette9. Ecologies of Sprawl: The Land-Use NexusEpilogue: The Special PlaceNotesBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

Post-World War II Oregon was a place of optimism and growth, a spectacular natural region from ocean to high desert that seemingly provided opportunity in abundance. With the passing of time, however, Oregon?s citizens ? rural and urban ? would find themselves entangled in issues that they had little experience in resolving. The same trees that provided income to timber corporations, small mill owners, loggers, and many small towns in Oregon, also provided a dramatic landscape and a home to creatures at risk. The rivers whose harnessing created power for industries that helped sustain Oregon?s growth ? and were dumping grounds for municipal and industrial wastes ? also provided passageways to spawning grounds for fish, domestic water sources, and recreational space for everyday Oregonians.The story of Oregon?s accommodation to these divergent interests is a divisive story between those interested in economic growth and perceived stability and citizens concerned with exercising good stewardship towards the state?s natural resources and preserving the state?s livability. In his second volume of Oregon?s environmental history, William Robbins addresses efforts by individuals and groups within and outside the state to resolve these conflicts. Among the people who have had roles in this process, journalists and politicians Richard Neuberger and Tom McCall left substantial legacies and demonstrated the ambiguities inherent in the issues they confronted.Landscapes of Conflict is the second volume of what is unquestionably the finest environmental history anyone has yet written for a single state?-and since Oregon has helped lead the nation in its response to environmental problems, while also exemplifying those problems within its own boundaries, Robbins's book will be of interest to readers far beyond the Pacific Northwest. - William Cronon, University of Wisconsin