Language in Time: The Rhythm and Tempo of Spoken Interaction

Hardcover | April 28, 2000

byPeter Auer, Elizabeth Couper-kuhlen, Frank Muller

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The authors here promote the reintroduction of temporality into the description and analysis of spoken interaction. They argue that spoken words are, in fact, temporal objects and that unless linguists consider how they are delivered within the context of time, they will not capture the fullmeaning of situated language use. Their approach is rigorously empirical, with analyses of English, German, and Italian rhythm, all grounded in sequences of actual talk-in-interaction.

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The authors here promote the reintroduction of temporality into the description and analysis of spoken interaction. They argue that spoken words are, in fact, temporal objects and that unless linguists consider how they are delivered within the context of time, they will not capture the fullmeaning of situated language use. Their appro...

Peter Auer is at University of Hamburg. Elizabeth Couper-Kuhlen is at University of Konstanz.

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Format:HardcoverPublished:April 28, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195109287

ISBN - 13:9780195109283

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"For those new to prosodic analysis, Language in Time is a demanding read, but it richly rewards the effort. Auer, Couper-Kuhlen, and Muller set a new standard for discourse analysts and functionally oriented linguists with a serious commitment to rethinking linguistics such that it is bothbased in the data of use and acountable to conversational practices as they emerge in the production of natural and socially consequential activities."--Language in Society