Last Cool Days by John StewartLast Cool Days by John Stewart

Last Cool Days

byJohn Stewart

Paperback | January 1, 1996

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Set in coloinal Trinidad, this powerfull intense novel explores the barriers between black and white in a higly stratified and racially deparcated society.
Marcus in a young black village bo wh gets fatefully attracted by the strangeness and privileges of white children in hisneighbourhood and is befriended by the English overseer's son Anthony. The sense of insecurity and alienation, instilling in him an adult rage that leads ultimately to tragedy.

"John Stewart draws a painful and all too credible picture of the squalor and injistice endured byt eh black community ... "
- The Times Literary Supplement

"The atmosphere and insight displayed in this book make it a considerable achievement."
- The Irish Times

"An impressive work, rich in symbolism and levels of meaning."
- Meale Hodge

John Stewart was born in Trinidad and educated in the United States, where he teaches at the University of California, Davis. His short stories have appeared in, among other places, The Faber Book of Contemporary Caribbean Stort Stories (1990) and Best West Indian Short Stores (London: Nelso, 1981). He is a recipient of a Roual societ...
Title:Last Cool DaysFormat:PaperbackDimensions:184 pages, 8.23 × 5.5 × 0.57 inPublished:January 1, 1996

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0920661556

ISBN - 13:9780920661550

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From Our Editors

Set in colonial Trinidad, this powerfully intense novel explores the barriers between black and white in a highly stratified and racially demarcated society. Marcus is a young black village boy who gets fatefully attracted by the strangeness and the privileges of white children in his neighborhood and is befriended by the English overseer's son Anthony. The awkwardness and instability of this relationship in time reinforce his sense of insecurity and alienation, instilling in him an adult rage that leads ultimately to tragedy.

Editorial Reviews

"John Stewart draws a painful and all too credible picture of the squalor and injustice endured by the black community..." - The Times Literary Supplement"The atmosphere and insight displayed in this book make it a considerable achievement." - The Irish Times"An impressive work, rich in symbolism and levels of meaning." - MERLE HODGE"...is poetry, prose and history told with the beauty, the sensitivity and the feeling typical of the West Indian novel that is no longer written." - The Toronto Review