Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of North American Vegetation: North of Mexico by Alan GrahamLate Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of North American Vegetation: North of Mexico by Alan Graham

Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of North American Vegetation: North of Mexico

byAlan Graham

Hardcover | May 1, 1998

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This book is a unique and integrated account of the history of North American vegetation and paleoenvironments over the past 70 million years. It includes discussions of the modern plant communities, causal factors for environmental change, biotic response, and methodologies. The historyreveals a North American vegetation that is vast, immensely complex, and dynamic.
Alan Graham is at Kent State University.
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Title:Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic History of North American Vegetation: North of MexicoFormat:HardcoverDimensions:370 pages, 8.7 × 11.1 × 1.1 inPublished:May 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019511342X

ISBN - 13:9780195113426

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Setting the Goal: Modern Vegetation of North America--Composition and Arrangement of Principal Plant Formations2. Cause and Effect: Factors Influencing Composition and Distribution of North American Plant Formations through Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic Time3. Context4. Methods, Principles, Strengths, and Limitations5. Late Cretaceous through Early Eocene North American Vegetational History: 70-50 Ma6. Middle Eocene through Early Miocene North American Vegetational History: 50-16.3 Ma7. Middle Eocene through Pliocene North American Vegetational History: 16.3-1.6 Ma8. Quaternary North American Vegetational History: 1.6 Ma to the Present9. The Origins of North American Biogeographic Affinities

Editorial Reviews

"Graham has provided us with a very well-written and broadly encompassing tome of the last 100 million years of North American vegetation. Graham proceeds in an orderly fashion by providing us with background information and concepts, for example in present-day climate and vegetation/climaterelations. A significant part of the book occupies itself with discussions of methodologists currently used in the studies of paleobotany/palynology, and these discussions include their limitations as well as their strengths." -- Jack A. Wolfe, American Association of Stratigraphic Palynologists,Inc., Sept. 2000