Latin American Law: A History of Private Law and Institutions in Spanish America

Paperback | May 1, 2009

byM. C. Mirow

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Private law touches every aspect of people's daily lives—landholding, inheritance, private property, marriage and family relations, contracts, employment, and business dealings—and the court records and legal documents produced under private law are a rich source of information for anyone researching social, political, economic, or environmental history. But to utilize these records fully, researchers need a fundamental understanding of how private law and legal institutions functioned in the place and time period under study.

This book offers the first comprehensive introduction in either English or Spanish to private law in Spanish Latin America from the colonial period to the present. M. C. Mirow organizes the book into three substantial sections that describe private law and legal institutions in the colonial period, the independence era and nineteenth century, and the twentieth century. Each section begins with an introduction to the nature and function of private law during the period and discusses such topics as legal education and lawyers, legal sources, courts, land, inheritance, commercial law, family law, and personal status. Each section also presents themes of special interest during its respective time period, including slavery, Indian status, codification, land reform, and development and globalization.

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Private law touches every aspect of people's daily lives—landholding, inheritance, private property, marriage and family relations, contracts, employment, and business dealings—and the court records and legal documents produced under private law are a rich source of information for anyone researching social, political, economic, or env...

M. C. MIROW is Associate Professor of Law and a founding faculty member at Florida International University College of Law in Miami.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:359 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:May 1, 2009Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292721420

ISBN - 13:9780292721425

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Table of Contents

List of IllustrationsAcknowledgmentsIntroductionPrologue: Indigenous LawPart I: Colonial Period1. Conquest and Colonization2. Structures and Courts3. Legal Education and Lawyers 4. Sources5. Personal Status6. Land and Inheritance7. Commercial Law8. Slavery 9. Indian Status and Indian LandPart II: Independence and the Nineteenth Century 10. Constitutions, Codes, Caudillos, and Commerce11. Private Law and Independence12. Structures and Courts13. Legal Education and Lawyers 14. Sources15. Codification16. Personal Status17. Land and Inheritance18. Commercial LawPart III: The Twentieth Century19. From Europe to America20. Structures and Courts21. Legal Education and Lawyers22. Sources23. Personal Status24. Land and Inheritance25. Commercial Law26. Land Reform27. Development, Investment, Globalization, and an Exception28. The GapConclusion: The Unfinished Business of Latin American Private LawNotesGlossaryBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

M.C. Mirow has set himself a difficult task, to contribute a one-volume introduction to Latin American law in English, and he has succeeded admirably. - Peter L. Reich