Latin: An Intensive Course by Floyd L. MorelandLatin: An Intensive Course by Floyd L. Moreland

Latin: An Intensive Course

byFloyd L. Moreland, Rita M. Fleischer

Paperback | October 19, 1977

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This is a comprehensive introduction to Latin forms and syntax, designed to train the student in reading ancient texts at an early stage.

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Title:Latin: An Intensive CourseFormat:PaperbackDimensions:480 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.19 inPublished:October 19, 1977Publisher:University of California Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520031830

ISBN - 13:9780520031838

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Customer Reviews of Latin: An Intensive Course

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Rated 5 out of 5 by from Intensive and comprehensive As the title says, this is an intensive introduction to the Latin language. Its purpose is to gain literacy and comprehension of Classical Latin as quickly as possible. It is not, therefore, recommended for self-study, unless you have some prior experience with Classical languages. I really like this as a class text. It follows the system of grammatical analysis and translation, which I prefer. The subjunctive and other tricky constructions are introduced early in the text, so as to offer maximal practice. This means that a student who has successfully completed this course will have a firm grasp on many aspects that cause other learners difficulty even much later into their studies. Although the book was devised for use in an intensive course that taught Latin over one summer (!), it is also suitable for a normal course, the pace being modified. It is too dry and technical to be used with middle-school students unless the students be bright or the teacher truly excellent. This is especially the case as there are no substantial cultural or historical elements: all focus is on the language. It is, however, suitable as a high-school or university text. I learned Ancient Greek through the Intensive Course textbook for that language, and can attest to the success of this method. I only wish that I had had the opportunity to learn Latin using this textbook.
Date published: 2017-07-18

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Preface to the Preliminary Edition
Preface to this Edition
INTRODUCTION
A. The Alphabet and Pronunciation
B. Syllabification
C. Accentuation
D. Word Order
ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS BOOK
GRAMMATICAL REVIEW
A SELECTED GLOSSARY OF IMPORTANT TERMS
UNIT ONE
A. The Verbal System
B. The Tenses of the Indicative
C. The Infinitive
D. The Four Conjugations
E. The Principal Parts
F. The Present Active Indicative System of the First Two conjugations
G. The irregular Verbsum, 'be'
H. The Noun System
I. The First Declension
UNIT TWO
A. The Perfect Active Indicative System of All Verbs
B. The Subjunctive Mood
C. Formation and the Subjunctive
D. Present Subjunctive of the Verbsum
E. Conditional Sentences
F. Genitive with Verbs of Accusing and Condemning
UNIT THREE
A. Nouns of the Second Declension
B. First-Second Declension Adjectives
C. Noun-Adjective Agreement
D. Adjectives Used as Nouns
E. Ablative of Means (Instrument)
F. Ablative of Manner (Modal Ablative)
G. Clauses of Purpose; Sequence of Tenses
H. Indirect Commands
UNIT FOUR
A. The Present Active System of All Four Conjugations
B. The Present Passive System of All Four Conjugations
C. The Perfect Passive System of All Four Conjugations
D. Review of Verb Conjugations
E. Ablative of Personal Agent
REVIEW: UNITS ONE TO FOUR
UNIT FIVE
A. Participles: Definition and Formation
B. Some Uses of the Participle
C. Periphrastics
D. Dative of Agent with the Passive Periphrastic
E. Dative of the Possessor
F. The Verbpossum, 'be able'
G. Complementary Infinitive
UNIT SIX
A. Nouns of the Third Declension
B. Infinitives
C. Indirect Statement: Subject Accusative and Infinitive
D. The Irregular Nounvis
E. Ablative of Separation
F. Accusative of Place to Which
G. The Locative Case
UNIT SEVEN
A. Demonstrative Adjectives
B. Personal Pronouns
C. Possessive Adjectives
D. Relative Pronoun
E. Interrrogative Adjective
F. Interrogative Pronoun
G. Ablative of Accompaniment
H. Ablative of Time When or Within Which
I. Accusative of Duration of Time and Extent of Space
J. Subjunctive in Subordinate Clauses in Indirect Statement
UNIT EIGHT
A. Adjectives of the Third Declension; Present Participles
B. Fourth Declension Nouns
C. Fifth Declension Nouns
D. Ablative of Respect (Specification)
E. The Irregular Verbeo,ire, 'go'
F. The Present Imperative
G. The Vocative Case
H. Datives of Purpose (Service) and Reference: The Double Dative Construction
REVIEW: UNITS FIVE TO EIGHT
UNIT NINE
A. Comparison of Adjectives
B. Irregular Comparison of Adjectives
C. Comparison withquam; Ablative of Comparison
D. Ablative of Degree of Difference
E. Adverbs and Their Comparison
F. Irregular Comparison of Adverbs
G. Partitive Genitive
UNIT TEN
A. Ablative Absolute
B. Adjectives with Genitive Singular in-ius
C. Ablative of Cause
D. Ablative and Genitive of Description
E. The Irregular Verbferoand Its Compounds
UNIT ELEVEN
A. Deponent Verbs
B. Semi-Deponent Verbs
C. Subjective and Objective Genitive
D. Predicate Genitive (Genitive of Characteristic)
E. Infinitive As Subject
F. The Irregular Verbsvolo, nolo, malo
REVIEW: UNITS NINE TO ELEVEN
UNIT TWELVE
A. Independent Uses of the Subjunctive
B. Direct Questions
C. Indirect Questions
D. The Adjectiveidem, eadem, idem, 'same'
E. The Pronoun and Adjectivequidam, 'certain'
F. The Intensive Adjectiveipse, ipsa, ipsum, 'self, very'
G. The Demonstrative Adjectiveiste, ista, istud, 'that (of yours)'
UNIT THIRTEEN
A. The Indefinite Pronounsaliquis, quis, quisquam, quisque
B. Dative with certain Intransitive Verbs
C. Impersonal Passives
D. Dative withCompound Verbs
E. The Verbflo, 'be made, be done, happen, become'
F. The Numerical Adjectiveduo, duae, duo, 'two'
UNIT FOURTEEN
A. Clauses of Result
B. Substantive Clauses of Result
C. Relative Clauses of Characteristic (Generic Relative Clauses)
D. Relative Clauses of Result
E. Relative Clauss of Purpose and Purpose Clauses Introduced by Adverbs
F. Indirect Reflexives
UNIT FIFTEEN
A.cumClauses
B.cumClauses and Ablatives Absolute
C. Other Words Introducing Temporal, Causal, and Concessive Clauses
D. Conjunctions with Indicative or Subjunctive
E. Clauses of Proviso
F. Accusative of Exclamation
UNIT SIXTEEN
A. The Gerund
B. The Gerundie
C. The Gerund and Gerundive Used to Express Purpose
D. Impersonal Verbs
E. The Impersonalsinterestandrefert
UNIT SEVENTEEN
A. Clauses of Fearing
B. Clauses of Doubting
C. Clauses of Prevention
D. The Supine
UNIT EIGHTEEN
A. Subjunctive by Attraction
B.futurum esse ut; fore ut
C. The Historical Infinitive
D. Shortened or Syncopated Forms of the Perfect Active System of Verbs
E.-ereforeruntin the Third Person Plural, Perfect Active Indicative
F. The Greek Accusative: Accusative of Respect or Accusative After Verbs in the Middle Voice
G. Adverbial Accusative
H. Genitive with Expressions of Remembering and Forgetting
I. Genitive of Indefinite Value
J. Ablative of Price
K.quod, 'the fact that'
REVIEW: UNITS TWELVE TO EIGHTEEN
APPENDIX
Nouns
Adjectives
Pronouns
Verbs
Formation of the Future Imperative
Review of the Syntax of Nouns
Review of the Syntax of Verbs
Participles
Gerunds
Gerundives
Supines
Conditions in Indirect Statement
Conditions in Other Subordinate Clauses
Additional Rules
Roman Names
A Note on Quantitative Rhythm
Numerals
LATIN-ENGLISH VOCABULARY
ENGLISH-LATIN VOCABULARY
INDEX