Latin Poetry and the Judgement of Taste: An Essay in Aesthetics

Paperback | June 3, 2007

byCharles Martindale

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This book argues for a new attention to the importance of beauty and the aesthetic in our response to poetry. Charles Martindale explores ways in which Kant's aesthetic theory, as set out in the Critique of Judgement, remains of fundamental importance for the modern critic. He argues that theKantian 'judgement of taste' is not formalist, and explores the relationship between the aesthetic and the political in our responses to art. Finally he urges the value of aesthetic criticism as pioneered by Walter Pater and others. The (mainly Latin) poems discussed are all translated, and the bookwill be of interest not only to classicists but to anyone interested in aesthetics, aestheticism, poetry, reception, comparative literature, and critical theory.

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This book argues for a new attention to the importance of beauty and the aesthetic in our response to poetry. Charles Martindale explores ways in which Kant's aesthetic theory, as set out in the Critique of Judgement, remains of fundamental importance for the modern critic. He argues that theKantian 'judgement of taste' is not formalis...

Charles Martindale is Professor of Latin at the University of Bristol.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:276 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:June 3, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199216126

ISBN - 13:9780199216123

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Table of Contents

1. Immanuel Kant and Aesthetic Judgement (Horace)2. Content, Form, and Frame (Catullus, Horace, Propertius)3. Distinguishing the Aesthetic: Politics and Art (Virgil, Horace)4. The Aesthetic Turn: Latin Poetry and Aesthetic Criticism (Lucretius, Ovid, Lucan)

Editorial Reviews

`Review from previous edition one can applaud Charles Martindale's bold call for a criticism that does not panic or dissemble when faced with the power of (say) Latin poetry to move and interest us now, in such different historical circumstances and such a different moral, and political,world.'Times Literary Supplement