Law and Providence in Joseph Bellamys New England: The Origins of the New Divinity in Revolutionary America by Mark Valeri

Law and Providence in Joseph Bellamys New England: The Origins of the New Divinity in Revolutionary…

byMark Valeri

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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This study of religious thought and social life in early America focuses on the career of Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790), a Connecticut Calvinist minister noted chiefly for his role in originating the New Divinity--the influential theological movement that evolved from the writings of Bellamy'steacher, Jonathan Edwards. Tracing Bellamy's contributions as a preacher, noted controversialist, and church leader from the Great Awakening to the American Revolution, Mark Valeri explores why the New Divinity was so immensely popular. Set in social contexts such as the emergent market economy, thewar against France, and the politics of rebellion, Valeri shows, Bellamy's story reveals much about the relationship between religion and public issues in colonial New England.

About The Author

Mark Valeri is at Lewis and Clark College.

Details & Specs

Title:Law and Providence in Joseph Bellamys New England: The Origins of the New Divinity in Revolutionary…Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 9.53 × 6.38 × 0.91 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195086015

ISBN - 13:9780195086010

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"Valeri's study of Joseph Bellamy provides us with an excellent account of an important figure in New England's history....Richly annotated and based on a wide study of the sources, this volume is rewarding and an important contribution to studies of American theological development."--ChurchHistory