Learning How to Feel: Childrens Literature and the History of Emotional Socialization, 1870-1970

Hardcover | August 24, 2014

byUte Frevert, Pascal Eitler, Stephanie Olsen

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Learning How to Feel explores the ways in which children and adolescents learn not just how to express emotions that are thought to be pre-existing, but actually how to feel. The volume assumes that the embryonic ability to feel unfolds through a complex dialogue with the social and culturalenvironment and specifically through reading material. The fundamental formation takes place in childhood and youth. A multi-authored historical monograph, Learning How to Feel uses children's literature and advice manuals to access the training practices and learning processes for a wide range ofemotions in the modern age, circa 1870-1970. The study takes an international approach, covering a broad array of social, cultural, and political milieus in Britain, Germany, India, Russia, France, Canada, and the United States.Learning How to Feel places multidirectional learning processes at the centre of the discussion, through the concept of practical knowledge. The book innovatively draws a framework for broad historical change during the course of the period. Emotional interaction between adult and child gave way toa focus on emotional interactions among children, while gender categories became less distinct. Children were increasingly taught to take responsibility for their own emotional development, to find "authenticity" for themselves. In the context of changing social, political, cultural, and genderagendas, the building of nations, subjects and citizens, and the forging of moral and religious values, Learning How to Feel demonstrates how children were provided with emotional learning tools through their reading matter to navigate their emotional lives.

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Learning How to Feel explores the ways in which children and adolescents learn not just how to express emotions that are thought to be pre-existing, but actually how to feel. The volume assumes that the embryonic ability to feel unfolds through a complex dialogue with the social and culturalenvironment and specifically through reading ...

Ute Frevert is Director at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and a Scientific Member of the Max Planck Society. From 2003 to 2007 she was professor of German history at Yale University and previously taught History at the Universities of Konstanz, Bielefeld and the Free University in Berlin. Her research interests include ...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:320 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.01 inPublished:August 24, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199684995

ISBN - 13:9780199684991

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Table of Contents

Pascal Eitler, Stephanie Olsen, and Uffa Jensen: Introduction1. Uffa Jensen: Mrs Gaskell's Anxiety2. Stephanie Olsen: Dickon's Trust3. Margrit Pernau: Ashgari's Piety4. Daniel Bruckenhaus: Ralph's Compassion5. Pascal Eitler: Doctor Dolittle's Empathy6. Magdalena Beljan and Benno Gammerl: Wendy's Love7. Ute Frevert: Piggy's Shame8. Anja Laukotter: Lebrac's Pain9. Bettina Hitzer: Jim Button's Fear10. Jan Plamper: Ivan's Bravery11. Juliane Brauer: Heidi's Homesickness12. Joachim C. Haberlen: Ingrid's BoredomMargrit Pernau: Epilogue: Translating Books, Translating Emotions