Learning Legacies: Archive To Action Through Women's Cross-cultural Teaching by Sarah Ruffing RobbinsLearning Legacies: Archive To Action Through Women's Cross-cultural Teaching by Sarah Ruffing Robbins

Learning Legacies: Archive To Action Through Women's Cross-cultural Teaching

bySarah Ruffing Robbins

Paperback | May 31, 2017

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Learning Legacies explores the history of cross-cultural teaching approaches, to highlight how women writer-educators used stories about their collaborations to promote community-building. Robbins demonstrates how educators used stories that resisted dominant conventions and expectations about learners to navigate cultural differences. Using case studies of educational initiatives on behalf of African American women, Native American children, and the urban poor, Learning Legacies promotes the importance of knowledge grounded in the histories and cultures of the many racial and ethnic groups that have always comprised America’s populace, underscoring the value of rich cultural knowledge in pedagogy by illustrating how creative teachers still draw on these learning legacies today.

Sarah Ruffing Robbins is a Lorraine Sherley Professor of Literature at Texas Christian University.
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Title:Learning Legacies: Archive To Action Through Women's Cross-cultural TeachingFormat:PaperbackDimensions:372 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.1 inPublished:May 31, 2017Publisher:University of Michigan PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0472053515

ISBN - 13:9780472053513

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Editorial Reviews

“[Learning Legacies] combines knowledge about teacher training and the history of education in the United States gained from extensive research into many formal archives, numerous site visits, and interviews with educators, archivists and others.  Robbins’s own autoethnographic reflections also form a crucial and welcome element of her research.”—Sandra A. Zagarell, Donald R. Longman Professor of English at Oberlin College and scholar of American Literature and Culture