Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography by Luci Left HandedLeft Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography by Luci Left Handed

Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho Autobiography

byLuci Left HandedCompiled byWalter DykForeword byEdward Sapir

Paperback | March 1, 1967

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With a simplicity as disarming as it is frank, Left Handed tells of his birth in the spring "when the cottonwood leaves were about the size of my thumbnail," of family chores such as guarding the sheep near the hogan, and of his sexual awakening. As he grows older, his account turns to life in the open: nomadic cattle-raising, farming, trading, communal enterprises, tribal dances and ceremonies, lovemaking, and marriage.
 
As Left Handed grows in understanding and stature, the accumulated wisdom of his people is made known to him. He learns the Navajo life founded upon principles: the necessity of honesty, foresightedness, self-discipline. The style of the narrative is almost biblical in its rhythms; but biblical, too, in many respects, is the traditional way of life it recounts.
Introducing this new edition is Luci Tapahonso, a professor of English at the University of Kansas. She is the author of A Breeze Swept Through and Saanii Dahataal—The Women Are Singing: Poems and Stories.
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Title:Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navaho AutobiographyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:378 pages, 8 × 5.27 × 0.82 inPublished:March 1, 1967Publisher:UNP - Bison Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803279582

ISBN - 13:9780803279582

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Reviews

From Our Editors

With a simplicity as disarming as it is frank, Left Handed tells of his birth in the spring "when the cottonwood leaves were about the size of my thumbnail", of family chores such as guarding the sheep near the hogan, and of his sexual awakening. As he grows older, his account turns to life in the open: nomadic cattle-raising, farming, trading, communal enterprises, tribal dances and ceremonies, lovemaking, and marriage. As Left Handed develops in understanding and stature, the accumulated wisdom of his people is made known to him. He learns the Navajo life founded upon principles: the necessity of honesty, foresightedness, self-discipline. The style of the narrative is almost biblical in its rhythms; but biblical, too, in many respects, is the traditional way of life it recounts.

Editorial Reviews

"An extraordinarily vivid and detailed story, full of earthily realistic dialogue, told with an amazing story teller’s craft."—The Roundup
- The Roundup