Lessons on the Noun Phrase in English: From Representation to Reference by Walter HirtleLessons on the Noun Phrase in English: From Representation to Reference by Walter Hirtle

Lessons on the Noun Phrase in English: From Representation to Reference

byWalter Hirtle

Hardcover | September 16, 2009

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Distinguishing the components that make up the meaning of a noun enables us to understand what permits us to say "Ground temperature plus one degrees," or to invent "small is beautiful." A careful look at the meaning and role of -'s and of words like a/the, any/some, this/that, often found in noun phrases, reveals how they refer to the speaker's message. Examining pronouns pin-points the fundamental role of the representation of a grammatical person in all noun phrases.

Based on Guillaume's theory of the word, Lessons on the Noun Phrase in English proposes a word-based analysis of the mental operations involved in producing a noun phrase, starting with representing the speaker's message, then relating the words, and finishing with reference back to the message. In outlining the theory, Hirtle reveals the marvellous feat we accomplish each time we speak.
Walter Hirtle is professeur associé at l'Université Laval, Quebec City, and the author of several books, including Lessons on the English Verb: No Expression without Representation and Language in the Mind: An Introduction to Guillaume's Theory.
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Title:Lessons on the Noun Phrase in English: From Representation to ReferenceFormat:HardcoverDimensions:464 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:September 16, 2009Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773536043

ISBN - 13:9780773536043

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Editorial Reviews

"Hirtle's methodology, inspired by that of Guillaume, is as sound and well-founded as that of the master. He has once again made Guillaume's psychomechanical approach to language accessible to a wide audience." Dennis Philps, University of Toulouse-Le Mirail