Let The Circle Be Unbroken

Mass Market Paperback | October 1, 1991

byMildred D. Taylor

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"This dramatic sequel to Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry is a powerful novel . . .capable of touching readers of any age." --The Christian Science Monitor

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From Our Editors

The year is 1935. The young Logan family watches as their friend is charged with murder and tried by an all-white jury. "A profoundly affecting novel".--Publishers Weekly. Coretta Scott King Award

From the Publisher

"This dramatic sequel to Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry is a powerful novel . . .capable of touching readers of any age." --The Christian Science Monitor

Mildred D. Taylor is the author of nine novels including The Road to Memphis, Let the Circle Be Unbroken, The Land, and Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. Her books have won numerous awards, among them a Newbery Medal (for Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry), four Coretta Scott King Awards, and a Boston Globe—Horn Book Award. Her book The Land wa...

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Format:Mass Market PaperbackPublished:October 1, 1991Publisher:Penguin Young Readers Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140348921

ISBN - 13:9780140348927

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from story worth telling It is 1934, during the Great Depression, and eleven year old Cassie Logan, who was first introduced in the 1977 Newbery Medal winner Roll of Thunder, Hear Me Cry, lives on a farm in rural Mississippi with her father David, mother Mary, older brother Stacey, younger brothers Christopher John and Little Man, and grandmother Big Ma. Her Uncle Hammer Logan frequently visits from Chicago. The Logans’ friend, T. J., must go on trial for murder and face an all-white jury. Then Mama’s cousin Bud, who married a white woman, brings his daughter Suzella from New York City to stay with the Logans for a while, and when she tries to pass for white there are humiliating consequences. And their neighbor, Mrs. Lee Annie decides that she wants to register to vote but faces a lot of opposition, including that from her landlord. Finally, Stacey runs away to work in the cane fields of Louisiana. Can the Logans find out where he is? And will he return home? Several people thought that Let the Circle Be Unbroken was better than Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. I read the latter and basically liked it. I didn’t care for the sequel quite as much. I didn’t think that the plot was as tight and focused. In addition to some common euphemisms (e.g., doggone, blasted), the “h” and “d” words are each used a couple of times, and the conversations seem filled with “Lord” this, “Lordy” that, and “Lord a mercy” as exclamations. The phrase “for God’s sake” also occurs. I did appreciate the fact that despite the frightening and turbulent times, the Logan family stands together and stands proud with courage, love, and understanding that enables them to face prejudice and mistreatment. The suffering of African-Americans in pre-civil rights times is a story worth telling, and Mildred Taylor tells it well. My biggest question concerns age-appropriateness. The book is recommended for ages 9-10 and up. First, I would think that the rather long chapters and some of the subject material might make it difficult to hold the attention of many nine and ten year olds. Second, there are some discussions that a lot of parents might not feel are appropriate for that age group. For example, in talking about how white men have used black women, an incident is cited where a black man was messing with a white girl giving a description of the consequences—they “cut off his privates.” At age eleven, Cassie is worried about her flat chest. A teenage girl, Jacey Peters who has been the object of Stacey’s interest, is found to be with child out of wedlock by a white boy. And there is a somewhat lengthy confrontation which includes charges of a black man bedding down a white woman. For these reasons, I would not recommend the book for anyone under at least thirteen, perhaps even sixteen. By weaving history into the storyline, Taylor generally gives the reader a good feeling for the hardships of the Depression Era. Let the Circle Be Unbroken is the fourth book, chronologically, in a five-book series that is based on stories of her family that she heard while growing up. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry was written first. There are two “prequels,” The Land and Song of the Trees, and one additional sequel, The Road to Memphis.
Date published: 2013-06-28

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From Our Editors

The year is 1935. The young Logan family watches as their friend is charged with murder and tried by an all-white jury. "A profoundly affecting novel".--Publishers Weekly. Coretta Scott King Award

Editorial Reviews

"Miss Taylor conveys the textures of life among black as well as white and writes not with rancor or bitterness over indignities but with pride, strength, and respect for humanity."—The New York Times"A profoundly affecting novel."—Publishers Weekly"The fear, cruelty, and the bewildering injustice of a hopelessly racist society are transcended by a family's strength, self-respect, and determination. The characters, both young and old, in all their variety and individuality come alive with penetrating humanness, while the effect of the storytelling is intensified by a lean, understated style and made more poignant by touches of lyrical sensitivity."—The Horn Book"This is fine writing, and readers will be moved by the intense drama of individual scenes and by their historical significance."—School Library Journal"A vivid, complex, carefully crafted, moving novel."—Children's Book Review Service"The Logans's story will strengthen and satisfy all who read it."—The Christian Science Monitor