Lies, Slander and Obscenity in Medieval English Literature: Pastoral Rhetoric and the Deviant Speaker by Edwin David CraunLies, Slander and Obscenity in Medieval English Literature: Pastoral Rhetoric and the Deviant Speaker by Edwin David Craun

Lies, Slander and Obscenity in Medieval English Literature: Pastoral Rhetoric and the Deviant…

byEdwin David CraunEditorAlastair Minnis, Patrick Boyde

Paperback | November 3, 2005

Pricing and Purchase Info

$63.36

Earn 317 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Drawing on manuscript sources, this book examines how the medieval clergy developed the authority and persuasive force to attempt to govern the day-to-day speech of Western Christians. It explores, for the first time, how Chaucer, Langland, Gower and the "Patience" poet presented and judged these attempts to label some political, social and private speech as deviant and destructive--as lying, slander, blasphemy and other Sins of the Tongue.
Title:Lies, Slander and Obscenity in Medieval English Literature: Pastoral Rhetoric and the Deviant…Format:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:November 3, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521022010

ISBN - 13:9780521022019

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The pastoral movement and deviant speech: major texts; 2. The lies of the Fall, the tongues of Pentecost: typing and converting the deviant speaker; 3. Exemplifying deviant speech: murmur in Patience; 4. Confessing the deviant speaker: verbal deception in the Confessio Amantis; 5. Reforming deviant social practices: turpiloquium/scurrilitas in the B Version of Piers Plowman; 6. Restraining the deviant speaker: Chaucer's Manciple and Parson; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Craun's analysis provides a model of how reinscribing the literary within its appropriate traditions, engaging the rhetorical backgrounds that fourteenth-century poets would have expected their readers to share, helps to bring poetry to life." Kathryn L. Lynch, Speculum--A Journal of Medieval Studies