Life in Custer's Cavalry: Diaries and Letters of Albert and Jennie Barnitz, 1867-1868 by Albert BarnitzLife in Custer's Cavalry: Diaries and Letters of Albert and Jennie Barnitz, 1867-1868 by Albert Barnitz

Life in Custer's Cavalry: Diaries and Letters of Albert and Jennie Barnitz, 1867-1868

byAlbert Barnitz, Jennie BarnitzEditorRobert M. Utley

Paperback | June 1, 1987

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Through the study of the Barnitz Papers, the author writes a vivid description of frontier army life; of the attitudes of officers and their wives toward Indians, settlers, and themselves; and of particular characters and events in the story of Indian warfare in Kansas after the Civil War.
Editor Robert Utley's books available in Bison Books editions include Billy the Kid: A Short and Violent Life; Frontier Regulars: The United States Army and the Indian, 1866-1891; and Frontiersmen in Blue: The United States Army and the Indian, 1848-1865.
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Title:Life in Custer's Cavalry: Diaries and Letters of Albert and Jennie Barnitz, 1867-1868Format:PaperbackDimensions:302 pages, 8 × 5.25 × 0.68 inPublished:June 1, 1987Publisher:UNP - Nebraska

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0803295537

ISBN - 13:9780803295537

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From Our Editors

Through the study of the Barnitz Papers, the author writes a vivid description of frontier army life; of the attitudes of officers and their wives toward Indians, settlers, and themselves; and of particular characters and events in the story of Indian warfare in Kansas after the Civil War.

Editorial Reviews

"Albert Barnitz. . .served with Custer's famed Seventh Cavalry for four years, 1867-70. . . . In 1867 Albert and Jennie (Platt), both of Ohio, married and headed for the Kansas frontier. Four months later the growing perils of Indian clashes forced her to return east. . . . [Their] letters and diaries, dated from January 17, 1867, to February 10, 1869, are vivid and accurate. . . . [They] provide a keen picture of life in the Seventh Cavalry, both in garrison and field, immediately after the Civil War."—The Historian - The Historian