Life Of Pi by Yann MartelLife Of Pi by Yann Martel

Life Of Pi

byYann Martel

Paperback | August 28, 2007

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about

One boy. One boat. One tiger.     
After the tragic sinking of a cargo ship, a solitary lifeboat remains bobbing on the wild, blue Pacific. The only survivors from the wreck are a sixteen-year-old boy named Pi, a hyena, a zebra (with a broken leg), a female orangutan--and a 450-pound Royal Bengal tiger. The scene is set for one of the most extraordinary and beloved works of fiction in recent years.
The award-winning author of six books, the most recent of which is Beatrice & Virgil, YANN MARTEL was born in Spain in 1963. He studied philosophy at Trent University, worked at odd jobs--tree planter, dishwasher, security guard--and travelled widely before turning to writing. He was awarded the Journey Prize for the title story in The...
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Title:Life Of PiFormat:PaperbackDimensions:480 pages, 8.94 × 6.06 × 1.06 inPublished:August 28, 2007Publisher:Knopf CanadaLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0676979025

ISBN - 13:9780676979022

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great! That book is really great.
Date published: 2017-11-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from best book ever This is the best book ever written! The way the words flowed together like water.I loved the main character he was super likable. And for some reason the fact that there was only one child and all animals as main characters really helped show off the descriptions instead of the conversations. The best part of the book was the ending, right when you think you knew what was going on bam something major happened. I've read this book years ago and it was my favourite then and years later it is still one of my favourites. Everyone must read this book.
Date published: 2017-11-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Honestly hated this book I was really excited to read it but was really disappointed. Most other people I know love it but I found it really frustrating to read.
Date published: 2017-10-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Lessons learned Everyone said the book is great and awesome and very good and so on and so forth but I am sorry I don't feel that way. After reading, I saw the movie and it gave me more appreciation for the book, although, it gave and took away from the book, it was a better movie than my imagination gave while reading the book. There was quite interesting lesson I learnt from the book.
Date published: 2017-10-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Human becoming more animal in survival mode Life of Pi is an intriguing book. I read it for a course I took in university about animals in human cultures, and then watched the movie. Yann Martel expertly weaves a tale about a human boy tapping into his animalistic side in order to survive a disaster at sea – on a lifeboat with a full-grown Bengal tiger. We had a lot of discussions about the connection between Pi and Richard Parker, debating whether they were friends or simply co-survivalists and which version of events at the end we believed was true.
Date published: 2017-10-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read and then watch the movie! Good book!
Date published: 2017-10-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok I really, really liked this book until the end. I'm one of those people if I don't like the ending then the book is ruined for me.
Date published: 2017-10-07
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Life of Pi The beginning was so slow it was like pulling teeth. once you got into the book about halfway it started to get better but still wasn't great. I did enjoy the animals though.
Date published: 2017-09-29
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Life of Pi This was not one of my favorite books. I just couldn't get interested in the concept.
Date published: 2017-09-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from good good storyline, a must read!
Date published: 2017-09-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book!! I love the adventure, heart and vivid images that Yann provides with his writing.
Date published: 2017-09-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite books! The details were so vivid I felt like I was part of the book while reading, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and recommend it!
Date published: 2017-09-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wonderful writing While at times, the book couldn't be a bit slow when it came to plot progression, the beautiful writing kept you hooked when you might have dropped it if it was another book.
Date published: 2017-08-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good read I really enjoyed the concept of the book. The first part of the book was really entertaining and I enjoyed reading it, the second part was good but it was slow.
Date published: 2017-08-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from OK I saw the movie first and I felt the same way about the movie as I did about the book. It was sad, interesting, different and entertaining. I didn't dislike it but I didn't love either. The movie was very true to the book, I think my experience of the book would have been different (more positive because of the unique nature maybe?) were it not for the the fact that I watched the movie first. I will say that the book had a lot of humourous moments, especially before Pi gets on the ship, the author has a way with words which makes everyday occurrences ironic and hilariously satirical. After the ship though it does get a lot more somber in tone (for obvious reasons).
Date published: 2017-08-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from OK I saw the movie first and I felt the same way about the movie as I did about the book. It was sad, interesting, different and entertaining. I didn't dislike it but I didn't love either. The movie was very true to the book, I think my experience of the book would have been different (more positive because of the unique nature maybe?) were it not for the the fact that I watched the movie first. I will say that the book had a lot of humourous moments, especially before Pi gets on the ship, the author has a way with words which makes everyday occurrences ironic and hilariously satirical. After the ship though it does get a lot more somber in tone (for obvious reasons).
Date published: 2017-08-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite books! I never get tired of this book! I read it again and again, and it's always such an adventure.
Date published: 2017-08-01
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not a Fan The beginning was decent and gets three stars in itself, but the second half was so incredibly boring.
Date published: 2017-07-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable enough. A neat concept for a novel but I prefer more realistic scenarios personally.
Date published: 2017-07-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable enough. A neat concept for a novel but I prefer more realistic scenarios personally.
Date published: 2017-07-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good read I can't describe this book any better than "insightful", there is so much that you learn about yourself through Pi's perspective. Slower read but worth it.
Date published: 2017-07-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I hated this book. It gets 2 stars for the idea (the rest is terrible). I had such high hopes for this book, given all the hype. Not impressed. Martel obviously fancies himself more of philosopher than he actually is. Yet another novel that appears to be little more than an exercise in self-indulgence.
Date published: 2017-07-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! I read this in highschool and I love it, it's quite a conversation starter!
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from intersting interesting book i read and analyzed in english class. one of a kind
Date published: 2017-07-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Still one of my favourites, all those years later! I loved this book when I first read it in French. I have since read it multiple times in English and every time I have such a great time. The new cover makes me want to buy a third copy (one in French, one in English), but that might be a little obsessive, haha!
Date published: 2017-07-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good This book was well written and an interesting storyline, but for me it wasn't a terrific read.
Date published: 2017-07-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Classic Read this book in highschool and still re-read every chance I get. I love the way the story is told. Highly recommend reading this.
Date published: 2017-07-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting read Not sure if its because I read this novel in class but I didnt overly enjoy the book.
Date published: 2017-07-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Liked it Martel is a great story teller. I wish his other novels got a great acclaim as this. Well worth thee read
Date published: 2017-07-13
Rated 1 out of 5 by from did not like I read it only because it won so many awards. disappointed.honestly dont know what the fuss was about.
Date published: 2017-07-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Need to Read I read this book for a high school course years ago and I am glad I did. It opened my horizons to reading different types of books and looking for the meaning in all stories. Recommend for young adults who are beginning their love of books. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-07-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great read I very much enjoyed this book. It was a unique and moving adventure. The book also has a personality, I remember very fondly how the author described the origin of the name "Pi" in the opening pages of the book. #plumreviews
Date published: 2017-07-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I really like this story Good book, beautiful new cover!
Date published: 2017-07-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good Book This book is well-written and worth a read but it is not my favourite story. #plumreviews
Date published: 2017-06-30
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Life of Pi Not my type of book, but I could see that it would be enjoyable to people who like this type.
Date published: 2017-06-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from a little slow A good read, but a little slow, especially for younger readers.
Date published: 2017-06-28
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Life of Pi An interesting book. I read it before high school English.
Date published: 2017-06-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourites I was lucky enough to receive a copy of this back in high school for doing well in my English course.I have re-read this so many times and each time the adventure and storytelling does not dissapoint
Date published: 2017-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite bools I really love this book. It is a page turner from start to finish. The ending will blow your mind. Recommended 100%.
Date published: 2017-06-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourite bools I really love this book. It is a page turner from start to finish. The ending will blow your mind. Recommended 100%.
Date published: 2017-06-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Solid This was a solid read! I enjoyed it a lot
Date published: 2017-06-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I didn't enjoy it Please know that this is only my opinion, and I am definitely no expert book reviewer feel free to ignore my review and read it for yourself! This book seemed so interesting and I had such high hopes for it. This book actually replaced To Kill a Mockingbird as reading material in my grade 11 class, so I figured that it was going to be a masterpiece. I was disappointed. Symbolism plays an important role in literature, but in my personal opinion it didn't fit properly in this book making it feel as though it was forced in without much effort to making it seem natural. Additionally, I found the start of the book to be incredibly dry and boring, and I realize that the introduction is generally this way, I felt that little was done in an effort to keep the reader engaged.
Date published: 2017-06-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from great read the book as a child and I still read it on occasions as an adult. I really enjoyed it and learned a lot from reading and really enjoyed the characters
Date published: 2017-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Canadian Classic This is a classic of CanLit. A really inspiring story that makes you change the way you think about the world. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A good read. The book is a great mix of drama, wacky fun, and mesmerizing imagery. I really enjoyed the book and plan on re-reading it some time in the future.
Date published: 2017-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from 5 Stars I have read multiple times, and will read again. Great story.
Date published: 2017-06-21
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Tedious I had to do an English assignment with this book and it was just too long for the semester. I'm sure if I read it on my own I would've liked it more.
Date published: 2017-06-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Inspiring A lovely book that makes you question what you truly believe.
Date published: 2017-06-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from incredible pi's journey is worth going laong for the ride. dont miss out on it
Date published: 2017-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from dont miss this is a classic of canadian literature and you have to read it. its brilliant and clever
Date published: 2017-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from wow one not to miss. the story of pi and his tiger stuck in a boat is brilliant.
Date published: 2017-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from wonderful a beautiful fanciful story with a dark twist.
Date published: 2017-06-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fabulous! Such a great, unique story. Riveting. Highly recommend
Date published: 2017-06-17
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I couldn't finish it I tried three times to finish this book, have yet been able to. Will try again
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from awesome Awesome piece of literature
Date published: 2017-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from loved it Awesome piece of literature
Date published: 2017-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Awesome piece of literature
Date published: 2017-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Awesome piece of literature
Date published: 2017-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Such a great adventure to read during summer
Date published: 2017-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Life of Pi The best book I have ever read
Date published: 2017-06-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesome! Had to read it for school, and thoroughly enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-06-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Really good This was a really good read. Highly recommend
Date published: 2017-05-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from classic this is a modern classic !
Date published: 2017-05-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Unique This was a very well written and interesting book. I haven't read anything else like it. It was an incredible story but I wouldn't read it again. Despite being so well written I found I just didn't enjoy a lot of the content.
Date published: 2017-05-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Creative and Stimulating! It's a very imaginative and well-woven story that I personally found interesting enough to help transition my reading taste from Percy Jackson (not that there's anything wrong with that series) to more mature and analytical pieces of literature (although this transition was mediated by our English teacher XD) It's a great book to have at a book club for variety in discussion and interpretation, due to the story's own ambiguous essence.
Date published: 2017-05-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Too graphic for me. I started out loving this book from page one about India and the zoo etc. Also the main character searching out different religions...Loved all that but once it was about animals/ppl on the boat and pages and pages of violence, I couldn't handle it. Read it for bookclub, but I truly didn't like this book at all.
Date published: 2017-05-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from LOVE THIS BOOK Really good book. If you're down for an adventure and the sturggles of fantasy and humanity, great read.
Date published: 2017-05-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it!! Such a great story! I gave it to my mom after, who isn't much into reading, and she also loved it!
Date published: 2017-05-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not a favorite of mine I really did not like this book. I did not find the characters to be agreeable or believable, and I really had trouble finishing it. Not to my taste.#plumrewards
Date published: 2017-05-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoyed it Such an entertaining story to read
Date published: 2017-05-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great A wonderful story and very entertaining and emotional
Date published: 2017-05-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable This book is far outside my comfort zone, but I've enjoyed reading it. It's vivid and colourful, and at times fantastic.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from touching great storytelling ! highly recommended
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Delight It's a great book, I don't think I'll go back to it but I'd easily reccommend it to anyone. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love this book Had to read this book as part of my school curriculum in grade 12 and remember it was hard to get into, but I ended up loving it at the end. Love the character development and the whole story of it, you really start to root for the main character and he almost becomes like your friend. Read it again as an adult and still love it. Even met Yann Martel once and he was an interesting man to speak to.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One Of Those Books That Should Be a Classic This was so well written, you would think it would be boring with a male stranded on a raft with a tiger - but no! Anything but! I could not put it down.
Date published: 2017-05-16
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good read It's hard to put down, a beautiful adventure. I liked it better than the movie.
Date published: 2017-05-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Journey to Endless Possibilities Life of Pi is about believing that anything is possible. Even when all seems lost, there is so much left. It's this giant paradox that reminds me of Violet Baudelaire's phrase "there's always something" from Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. It's wonderful book to get us through even the most impossible moments in our lives.
Date published: 2017-05-09
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Okay book The story was okay, but not my favorite kind of book. Have read a lot better.
Date published: 2017-05-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! I thought this was a great book to read. I loved the flow of the storytelling and all of the symbolism and extra insight that could be read
Date published: 2017-05-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautifully written This story was beautifully written and the story came together in such a heartbreaking and touching way. I would highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-04-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love it everyone needs to read this novel
Date published: 2017-04-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyable Read This book has an interesting premise and is easy to read/follow. It's a good book to sit down and relax with.
Date published: 2017-04-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Grrrrrrrrrrrreat!... Too much? ;-) Another book I had to read for high school English class and really enjoyed.
Date published: 2017-04-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great The book was great but the end was the best part.
Date published: 2017-04-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great story! A fantastic story with a great ending. A very different and exciting book.
Date published: 2017-04-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Different Kind of Story If you like animals and want a different kind of adventure story to read than this is the book for you.
Date published: 2017-04-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from good book A little dry at the beginning but overall very good
Date published: 2017-03-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I loved this! A thought provoking, well written, and adventurous book. I didn't love the ending of the story, but most of the book was fantastic. It sits with me still, and I'm very happy I read it.
Date published: 2017-03-09
Rated 2 out of 5 by from People loved this?! I had such high hopes for this book, given all the hype. Not impressed. Martel obviously fancies himself more of philosopher than he actually is. Yet another novel that appears to be little more than an exercise in self-indulgence.
Date published: 2017-03-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from So well written I read this in high school and loved it! Highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-03-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Mind-boggling Read this over two years ago and still remains fresh in my mind. The movie helps in visualizing.
Date published: 2017-02-25
Rated 3 out of 5 by from okay not really my kind of book by it was a nice read.
Date published: 2017-02-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Once I started reading .... I could stop. Great Read!!
Date published: 2017-02-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Unique One of the most unusual and unpredictable stories I've ever read!
Date published: 2017-02-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing! In this story that also includes some wonderful humour, there are many pearls of wisdom buried throughout, but the one that stands out the most is the constant, uplifting reminder that you can still find beauty, spirituality and hope in a world that is often plagued by cruelty and ugliness by man’s infinite inhumanity to man. Life of Pi rewards the reader in many ways, and how much you like it will almost certainly depend on how much tolerance you have for philosophical and religious questions, and whether you enjoy a little soul-searching. I devoured this original, beautiful book, and I expect it will stay with me for a long time.
Date published: 2017-02-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my all-time favourites! I've read this book a couple times, and I absolutely love it.
Date published: 2017-02-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Stunning Great book that really gets you thinking. Filled with adventure.
Date published: 2017-02-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My Favourite I had to read this in high school, and it's been one of my favourite books since then. A wonderful, captivating story that makes you think about life.
Date published: 2017-02-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Okay read I thought it was well written but not really my kind of book. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-02-02
Rated 3 out of 5 by from not the greatest Not the greatest read...I found it incredibly slow to get through
Date published: 2017-02-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Book! Good book. Well written. Hands down better than the movie.... and I enjoyed the movie! Read the book first!
Date published: 2017-01-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Exploration of Culture & Religion For those of you who enjoyed the film, read the book. Although the base story is enchanting and beautiful, the book offers subtle but inspiring ideas and views on culture and religion that can only be found be re-reading the pages. #plumreviews
Date published: 2017-01-29
Rated 2 out of 5 by from I Couldn't Finish It It was just dull. If it weren't for a reading assignment for school, I'd have never picked up this book.
Date published: 2017-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Diverse, Rich and Memorable Time for a letter to one of the books that changed my life forever, guys! I only tend to write "letters" to books that have affected me as a person and as a whole. Yann Martel's Life of Pi is one of those books. I can see why the world went crazy. Dear My One and Only Special Book, I expected much worse from you. When I began reading Young Adult Fiction, I was introduced to you and your movie (which was fabulous as well), but I had doubts. A book about a boy and a tiger, both stranded on a float-boat-thing in the middle of the Pacific where there are fantasy aspects? That didn't seem like quite my cup of tea. And then, tenth grade rolled around and my friends, who had English first semester, couldn't stop raving about you. I began to anticipate your arrival into my heart more and more. (That also couldn't sound even more cheesier). They kept telling me about how there is a big shocker at the end of you and how our teacher explained it amazingly. I COULDN'T WAIT. I read you almost in a night, in a sitting. I finished you before the rest of my class did, and I couldn't stop squealing with my best friend about the ending and everything. I would like to share your plot with the rest of Goodreads and the blogging community, if you don't mind. "Richard Parker has stayed with me. I've never forgotten him. Dare I say I miss him? I do. I miss him. I still see him in my dreams. They are nightmares mostly, but nightmares tinged with love. Such is the strangeness of the human heart. I still cannot understand how he could abandon me so unceremoniously, without any sort of goodbye, without looking back even once. That pain is like an axe that chops at my heart." People. Life of Pi is just absolutely beautiful, remarkable and it changed my life. It carries such a powerful message of hope and realism, stuck in a story that focuses on animals and how we humans act like them constantly. We've seen this animalistic comparison in other classics (because I would certainly call this gorgeous thing a classic, but not in an old, rusty kind of way) like William Golding's Lord of the Flies, but this was just completely different and intriguing. Honestly, I prefer books that present a specific concept in a more modern setting that is relatable for me. I rather have an instant connection with a character than a wicked setting. Pi Patel is our amazing hero, who definitely represents the characteristics of a hero well. He is living a normal-ish life, living in Pondicherry, India, where his father owns the Pondicherry Zoo. Pi has always had this connection with animals, and he is immediately torn apart when his father announces that their family is moving to Canada. This is where the craziness occurs. The family heads onto a ship, which sinks, and Pi is the sole survivor. He spends days at sea, with three animals: a monkey, a hyena, and Richard Parker, a tiger who Pi has an amazing relationship with as the book progresses. Agh, how I wish I could endure the same feelings as I did while reading. I did not read this book because I was required to at school. I know many people personally who actually did not even finish this book because we discussed it (at little too much) at school. YOU'RE NUTS. If you are thinking of putting this one aside and not reading it, then I'm not talking to you, my friend. Life of Pi is mesmerizing, I honestly felt like it was a dream after I finished it. What's amazing is that we have one sole protagonist, and we never get tired of him. Yann Martel also plays with the format of the book he's writing, occasionally telling the story from his own author perspective, and moving on to Pi's perspective. It's like a diary, though there is also more to it. Martel also experiments with splitting the book into three parts, one being a retelling of Pi's past and future, while the other two being the "Better Story" and the other as "Dry Yeastless Factuality." You will understand that better while reading the book. One story is more imaginative than the other, though the ending of this story seriously gives readers a good finish, a satisfying finish where we will not be asking any more questions. Everything will be answered for us, and somehow, we will be believing in God more than ever. Or at least, I found myself in that position. "Life will defend itself no matter how small it is. Every animal is ferocious and dangerous. It may not kill you, but it will certainly injure you. It will scratch you and bite you, and you can look forward to a swollen, pus-filled infection, a high fever and a ten-day stay in the hospital." Yann Martel's use of imagery in inexplainable. It's impossible for me to describe how he does it. Every word, every sentence, every paragraph, we find ourselves seeing that there is a background story to it all, and that Martel utilizes specific words for specific reasons, to show something. My English teacher occasionally over-analyzed things which got me a little frustrated (specifically sentences that reference colours and whatnot) but I must admit that this is the book that has the most depth in it. YOU HAVE TO WATCH THE MOVIE TOO. A big applause to the directors, producers, screenwriters, media workers and actors for doing a stellar job on making this gorgeous story come to life. I honestly didn't have any complaints, except for the obvious taking-away of specific details from the plot. You cannot even guess how the imagery looks in the movie. It's exactly how I pictured it, funny when looking at the fact that most films that are based on films are horrible. (*cough* Divergent *cough*) I adore you, Life of Pi. I have so many friends that adore you too, and I WOULD LIKE TO RECOMMEND YOU TO THE WHOLE WORLD. Everyone, grab a copy of this and the movie, and spend a few days (or binge it all into one) and enjoy. Thank you, Yann Martel and the publisher.
Date published: 2017-01-24
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good book Definitely interesting and captures your attention but not my favourite.
Date published: 2017-01-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A book you need to read twice This book is quite spectacular. A great read. I highly recommend you read it and then when you've finished, you'll want/need to read it again. You'll have a different perspective the second time around. Honestly I think everyone should read it at once. The imagery is quite outstanding.
Date published: 2017-01-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting It reminds me of a very real event that occurred on a boat..
Date published: 2017-01-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good This was a very well written and interesting book. Completely different from anything else I've read.
Date published: 2017-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing One of the most brilliant works of literature of modern times.
Date published: 2017-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book! To be truthful, I'm not a huge reader but found this book caught my attention for the entire duration. It was a unique story with great adventure and I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a good read.
Date published: 2017-01-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Worth The Read I would bring this book to work and would read it on 15 minute breaks. Most of the time I didn't want to put it down at the end of the break. It is a great read!
Date published: 2017-01-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from EPIC Martel is an amazing story weaver. He tells a breath taking tale that captures every bit of your imagination. Only to blow your mind making you want to re-read this story instantly after to see what you've been missing the whole time the first time through. I cannot recommend this book enough and it deserves all the awards and accolades and more which it receives.
Date published: 2017-01-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Inspiring! This book had a slow start but I recommend to push through it, the book becomes so intriguing. Absolutely amazing!
Date published: 2017-01-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Glad I Read This It took me ten years to finally read this book because for some reason I thought it was a fantasy book and never really looked further into it. My mistake! I'm so glad I've finally read this. I found the beginning of the story to be a little slow, but stick with it - the scenes when Pi is trapped on the lifeboat are amazing. At the beginning of the book, the narrator says that the story he's about to tell will change the way you think. I was skeptical about what that might mean, but by the time I'd finished the book (and for a while after), the story was in my thoughts (without giving anything away). Read this is you want a good story that will make you do some thinking.
Date published: 2017-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Action-packed The reader is immersed into an adventure of survival with the protagonist with plenty of twists and turns to keep things interesting.
Date published: 2017-01-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book! I rally enjoyed this book! Slow to start, but then I couldn't put it down!
Date published: 2017-01-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Life Changing. Though I found this book had a very slow start, after the first few chapters I was fully immersed in the story. It was a life changing read, and so very moving. I recommend this book to everyone.
Date published: 2017-01-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful I surprised myself by loving this book! It contains discussion on religion, meaning (as in how we understand the world), and truth. The majority of this book goes into great detail about how the main character survives while being lost at sea, yet Martel somehow kept my attention the entire time and I was greatly moved by the ending. A worthwhile read!
Date published: 2017-01-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful read This book takes you on a journey - it's written beautifully and I love the adventure Patel goes on. You are constantly questioning the reality of it, and rooting for this young boy to survive. Really enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-01-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from It was okay This was fascinating to read, but it starts out kind of boring. It isn't until he gets on the boat that it gets more interesting.
Date published: 2017-01-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good book, but not for me This was fascinating to read, but it starts out kind of boring. It isn't until he gets on the boat that it gets more interesting.
Date published: 2017-01-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Be patient, it gets better! This may try your patience until he is on the boat. The story from there gets more interesting and has a lot to teach the reader. Martel is a strong writer and your time with the protagonist and Richard Parker will give you a lot to think about.
Date published: 2017-01-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Awesome Had to read it in class. Great book to analyze and enjoyable to read.
Date published: 2017-01-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Became an instant classic and rightly so A must read in modern times and I'm sure it will stand the test of time. Re-readable, though provoking and wonderful.
Date published: 2017-01-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great novel Beautiful, well-written, captivating. If you like descriptive writing and plot twists with a hint of magic, you will love this book.
Date published: 2016-12-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Favourite Book One of my favourite books to date. I have read it numerous times again since highschool. A must-read for highschool students and adults!
Date published: 2016-12-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Okay I had to read this book in high school but probably will never read it again. It was a long read and dragged on at points. Overall the story was quite interesting and thought-provoking
Date published: 2016-12-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing a great book. loved it more then I thought I would
Date published: 2016-12-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this novel! Even though, I haven't met a novel I haven't loved, this one surprised me. I heard tons of people complaining about the book, but I loved it. I had to read it for class but I could NOT put it down. Martel is an amazing story writer.
Date published: 2016-12-28
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not great Very boing and hard to get into #plumreview
Date published: 2016-12-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Gets better with age I read this as a teen and really enjoyed it, but it wasn't until I picked it up again in my late twenties that I really became enthralled. I felt as though I was on the boat, living every moment with the protagonist. If you've read it before, read it again. If you haven't, what are you waiting for?
Date published: 2016-12-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it! The ending completely blew my mind.
Date published: 2016-12-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good. Great, even. The bane of high school english teachers everywhere. For a reason, for sure. But for good reason? Certainly.
Date published: 2016-12-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Enjoy! I adore you, Life of Pi. I have so many friends that adore you too, and I WOULD LIKE TO RECOMMEND YOU TO THE WHOLE WORLD. Everyone, grab a copy of this and the movie, and spend a few days (or binge it all into one) and enjoy. Thank you, Yann Martel and the publisher.
Date published: 2016-12-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Life of Pi Little long winded in places, but still a delightful read.
Date published: 2016-12-19
Rated 4 out of 5 by from life of pi incredible story, takes a while to figure out, enjoyed more the second time i read it.
Date published: 2016-12-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from LOVED LOVED LOVED IT I loved this bbok. All its quirks and fantastic creatures. I remember to this day where I was when I realized who/what Richard Parker was. One of the best moments in a book ever! And the ending was superb.
Date published: 2016-12-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enthralling A very captivating and through provoking novel. I did have a bit of an issue with the ambiguous ending, but definitely worth a read.
Date published: 2016-12-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourites This is officially one of my favourite books without a doubt. It's worth reading if you like learning about new cultures told in an interesting perspective that can be both touching and funny and truly emotional.
Date published: 2016-12-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Pretty Good I had no idea what this book was about going into it and I really enjoyed it. It has a pretty good message at the end but I can see how some people might get frustrated by the ending.
Date published: 2016-12-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from I want to love this book I love the story however the actual writing just isn't for me, I found it incredibly hard to get through #PlumReview
Date published: 2016-12-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from LOVED IT!!! This book was something different, really liked it!!
Date published: 2016-12-07
Rated 1 out of 5 by from I did not like it. I heard good things about it but was not impressed.
Date published: 2016-12-06
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Life of Pi I heard plenty of good reviews about this book and finally got around to reading it after some time. I didn't enjoy it in the slightest.
Date published: 2016-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved! Story is deep, complex and thought-provoking.
Date published: 2016-12-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My All-Time Favourite Book If I had to chose my favourite book ever, Life of Pi would be it (and I've read a lot of books...). I read it when it was first released, and have read it several times since - I always take away something different from this magical novel with each read even though I'm so familiar with the story. I think the ending of this book is one of the things that makes it truly incredible and would certainly recommend it as a must-read to everyone!
Date published: 2016-11-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Awesome My friend really liked this book and recommended it to me, so I bought it. I read it at first couple of years ago, but couldn't finish it. However when I decided to retry reading this book, I really enjoyed it. I'm glad I tried to finish it. The beginning was slow for me, but afterwards the book get better.
Date published: 2016-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Really enjoyed it A friend recommended this book to me. I was skeptical about reading it because I didn't think I would enjoy it. I'm glad I did! I have never read a book quite like it. The story was very captivating. I was hooked from beginning to end.
Date published: 2016-11-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Book This book is really new and a really fresh read. It follows the life of Pi Patel after a shipwreck which claimed the life of his family and how he survived on a lifeboat, adrift the Pacific Ocean, for months, alone with a tiger. It's really interesting to read, and I really enjoyed it.
Date published: 2016-11-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent This book is very deep, emotional, and complex. I hear different reviews and people take it in differently, which I think is great. It makes you question many things about humanity, yourself, others, and nature.
Date published: 2016-11-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Once in a Lifetime It must be said again, this is an extraordinary novel. Yann Martel has crafted a true masterpiece, a once-in-a-lifetime book that will stand the test of time and live up to anyone's expectations. 'Pi' Patel, named after a swimming pool (!) begins life in India and works as a zookeeper's assistant for his father in the family zoo until the day his dad takes the family and some of the animals to America in an unsafe cargo boat. This novel describes what happens during that ill-fated crossing. It is a complex read. The events themselves are simple: the quotidian survival tasks he must perform to exist at all, let alone with Richard Parker on the ready are juxtaposed with his innermost thoughts on God, religion - indeed, all religions, in fact just about everything and anything you can think about on a long ocean voyage all by yourself! The movie was a surprise and was fairly good but the book is leaps and bounds better than the movie, as usual. Highly recommend to anyone who likes to think.
Date published: 2016-11-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An instant favorite This book captivates you from the beginning to the end.
Date published: 2016-11-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Give this book a chance... ...to change your life. One of the best adventure books I've ever read. The right amount of suspense and mystery, and a tantalizingly complex tale. Absolutely worth a read #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Great Coming of Age Story Disclaimer: I received this signed book as part of a Random House Facebook giveaway. I wasn't expecting to enjoy this book as much as I did. The beginning didn't grab me, and it was confusing as it shifted story lines, but once Pi's voyage started it became really fascinating. Once I got near the end, I kept reading without stopping because I didn't want to put the book down without knowing how it all ended. I wish I paid more attention to details as I read, but the descriptions made up for the times I started to skim lines. Pi's life following up to the main part of the story was a curious thing - and I couldn't help but think at the time that it was irrelevant - yet his exploration of religion and his relationship to animals and the zoo were intriguing. Once the voyage began, I knew the type of character he was and it was a great experience to be immersed in his character as he suffered through his trials. I didn't understand who the tiger was at first, as the name Richard Parker was thrown around as though it were an important man that Pi was betrayed by; it threw me off as it jolted me back and forth through story lines. But the relationship that Pi had with Richard Parker was interesting to see developed, and I wasn't expecting to enjoy his training of the tiger and his survival story as much as I did. One would think that discussing the day to day boring bits of surviving hundreds of days on a boat would be mind-numbingly boring, but everything was described so wonderfully that I found myself hoping, cheering, cringing, and grimacing along with Pi. The story made me think - think things like 'would I be able to kill and eat raw fish so easily?' or, more so, 'would I even be able to survive; could I make the necessary preparations to even try?' - and that was a nice change to just experiencing the story through someone else's eyes. My favourite part of the story was when Pi and the tiger arrived at the botanically impossible island. It was fascinating to see the poisonous algae and hilariously-unprepared-for-danger meerkats, as well as how Richard Parker explored the island and how Pi discovered the island's carnivorous secrets, survived his stay, and made the most of his time there. The end of their journey was too abrupt, and my skimming led to me missing what happened to Richard Parker - however, considering how it felt to Pi, too, I think it was a nice mistake that I made because it made me read back and experience it properly. It was both intriguing and boring when Pi was questioned at the end, and that kept me reading without putting the book down as it was an interesting combination of feelings. I felt indignant for Pi when the Japanese men didn't believe his story, but it was a nice touch to add the sense of doubt about his absurd journey. I didn't get much of a religious kick out of it, but the storytelling behind the journey itself was so amazing that I wondered what other normally boring things the author could describe that would keep me latched on for pages. I don't think I'd read this book again - at least not any time soon - but I'm glad that I finally got a chance to do so, because it was great to see what others found fascinating about it and it was a nice experience to think 'what if?' thoughts that involved me, instead of concepts, for once. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Noah's Ark? This book, with it's focus on different religions and it's modern telling of Noah's Ark, makes me think it's some kind about the planet, or at least the Middle East - Noah's Ark being a part of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Date published: 2016-11-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from hard read The story is not bad but english is not my first language and the book is full of technical boat vocabulary . . .
Date published: 2016-11-11
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book I really enjoyed the journey that this book took me on. A great story about hope and sacrifice #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-09

Read from the Book

Chapter 1My suffering left me sad and gloomy.Academic study and the steady, mindful practice of religion slowly brought me back to life. I have remained a faithful Hindu, Christian and Muslim. I decided to stay in Toronto. After one year of high school, I attended the University of Toronto and took a double-major Bachelor’s degree. My majors were religious studies and zoology. My fourth-year thesis for religious studies concerned certain aspects of the cosmogony theory of Isaac Luria, the great sixteenth-century Kabbalist from Safed. My zoology thesis was a functional analysis of the thyroid gland of the three-toed sloth. I chose the sloth because its demeanour — calm, quiet and introspective — did something to soothe my shattered self.There are two-toed sloths and there are three-toed sloths, the case being determined by the forepaws of the animals, since all sloths have three claws on their hind paws. I had the great luck one summer of studying the three-toed sloth in situ in the equatorial jungles of Brazil. It is a highly intriguing creature. Its only real habit is indolence. It sleeps or rests on average twenty hours a day. Our team tested the sleep habits of five wild three-toed sloths by placing on their heads, in the early evening after they had fallen asleep, bright red plastic dishes filled with water. We found them still in place late the next morning, the water of the dishes swarming with insects. The sloth is at its busiest at sunset, using the word busy here in a most relaxed sense. It moves along the bough of a tree in its characteristic upside-down position at the speed of roughly 400 metres an hour. On the ground, it crawls to its next tree at the rate of 250 metres an hour, when motivated, which is 440 times slower than a motivated cheetah. Unmotivated, it covers four to five metres in an hour.The three-toed sloth is not well informed about the outside world. On a scale of 2 to 10, where 2 represents unusual dullness and 10 extreme acuity, Beebe (1926) gave the sloth’s senses of taste, touch, sight and hearing a rating of 2, and its sense of smell a rating of 3. If you come upon a sleeping three-toed sloth in the wild, two or three nudges should suffice to awaken it; it will then look sleepily in every direction but yours. Why it should look about is uncertain since the sloth sees everything in a Magoo-like blur. As for hearing, the sloth is not so much deaf as uninterested in sound. Beebe reported that firing guns next to sleeping or feeding sloths elicited little reaction. And the sloth’s slightly better sense of smell should not be overestimated. They are said to be able to sniff and avoid decayed branches, but Bullock (1968) reported that sloths fall to the ground clinging to decayed branches “often”.How does it survive, you might ask.Precisely by being so slow. Sleepiness and slothfulness keep it out of harm’s way, away from the notice of jaguars, ocelots, harpy eagles and anacondas. A sloth’s hairs shelter an algae that is brown during the dry season and green during the wet season, so the animal blends in with the surrounding moss and foliage and looks like a nest of white ants or of squirrels, or like nothing at all but part of a tree.The three-toed sloth lives a peaceful, vegetarian life in perfect harmony with its environment. “A good-natured smile is forever on its lips,” reported Tirler (1966). I have seen that smile with my own eyes. I am not one given to projecting human traits and emotions onto animals, but many a time during that month in Brazil, looking up at sloths in repose, I felt I was in the presence of upside-down yogis deep in meditation or hermits deep in prayer, wise beings whose intense imaginative lives were beyond the reach of my scientific probing.Sometimes I got my majors mixed up. A number of my fellow religious-studies students–muddled agnostics who didn’t know which way was up, in the thrall of reason, that fool’s gold for the bright–reminded me of the three-toed sloth; and the three-toed sloth, such a beautiful example of the miracle of life, reminded me of God.I never had problems with my fellow scientists. Scientists are a friendly, atheistic, hard-working, beer-drinking lot whose minds are preoccupied with sex, chess and baseball when they are not preoccupied with science.I was a very good student, if I may say so myself. I was tops at St. Michael’s College four years in a row. I got every possible student award from the Department of Zoology. If I got none from the Department of Religious Studies, it is simply because there are no student awards in this department (the rewards of religious study are not in mortal hands, we all know that). I would have received the Governor General’s Academic Medal, the University of Toronto’s highest undergraduate award, of which no small number of illustrious Canadians have been recipients, were it not for a beef-eating pink boy with a neck like a tree trunk and a temperament of unbearable good cheer.I still smart a little at the slight. When you’ve suffered a great deal in life, each additional pain is both unbearable and trifling. My life is like a memento mori painting from European art: there is always a grinning skull at my side to remind me of the folly of human ambition. I mock this skull. I look at it and I say, “You’ve got the wrong fellow. You may not believe in life, but I don’t believe in death. Move on!” The skull snickers and moves ever closer, but that doesn’t surprise me. The reason death sticks so closely to life isn’t biological necessity–it’s envy. Life is so beautiful that death has fallen in love with it, a jealous, possessive love that grabs at what it can. But life leaps over oblivion lightly, losing only a thing or two of no importance, and gloom is but the passing shadow of a cloud. The pink boy also got the nod from the Rhodes Scholarship committee. I love him and I hope his time at Oxford was a rich experience. If Lakshmi, goddess of wealth, one day favours me bountifully, Oxford is fifth on the list of cities I would like to visit before I pass on, after Mecca, Varanasi, Jerusalem and Paris.

Bookclub Guide

1. As Pi’s father says, when he is explaining the ferocity of the zoo animals to his sons, “Life will defend itself no matter how small it is.” In what ways does Pi defend himself in this novel?2. With his stories about zoos and zoology, Pi teaches us that the ability to adapt is crucial not only to animals but to humans, and is rooted in the will to survive. How do Pi’s theories of zoo-keeping play out on the lifeboat? Does Pi go through a transformation on his journey? What does he learn?3. Our author discovers the story of Pi Patel after an elderly man in an Indian coffee house tells him, “I have a story that will make you believe in God.” As a young man, Pi shocks his family and local religious officials by embracing Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam, and sees no reason to pick just one. And on the lifeboat, it is God that Pi turns to in his despair. Discuss the role of religion, and religious stories, in this novel.4. When Pi meets with the Japanese officials at the end of his journey and tells them his story, they do not believe him and ask what really happened. Pi provides them with a new story, one of “dry, yeastless factuality,” without animals, and then asks which one they prefer. Discuss the nature of storytelling and belief in relation to Life of Pi, and to life.5. “As for hearing, the sloth is not so much deaf as uninterested in sound.” “To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.” As a story of death, loss, fear and destruction, Life of Pi has at its heart a number of very tragic events. However, one of the most pervasive elements of the novel is its very matter-of-fact humour. Why do you think this is? What is the effect on you, as a reader?6. Near the end of Life of Pi, Pi and Richard Parker come ashore on a free-floating island comprised entirely of algae and inhabited only by many, many meerkats. Why does Pi decide to leave the island? What is the significance of this story? Is there a difference between survival and life?7. Whereas the bulk of this novel is told by Pi Patel -- “in his voice and through his eyes,” our author tells us -- we also see the current-day Pi through the eyes of the author, and read “excerpts from the verbatim transcript” of the young Pi’s interview with the Japanese officials. Why? Discuss the effect of and possible reasons for the narrative structure of this novel.8. The Author’s Note ends with a what seems to be a call to arms: “If we, citizens, do not support our artists, then we sacrifice our imagination on the altar of crude reality and we end up believing in nothing and having worthless dreams.” In reviews of Life of Pi, Yann Martel has been equally and abundantly praised for his realism and his great imagination. Do you see a conflict between these approaches to writing fiction? What is the role of “truth” in fiction?9. In Life of Pi we know Richard Parker to be a 450-pound Royal Bengal tiger mistakenly named after the hunter who captured him, and Pi’s companion during his seven months at sea. But there are further nautical stories involving Richard Parkers, outside of this book: Edgar Allan Poe’s Richard Parker was eaten by his shipmates in the novel The Adventures of Arthur Gordon Pym, a real-life cabin boy named Richard Parker was eaten by his fellow castaways after the sinking of the Mignonette in the 1870s, and so on. Who is Richard Parker? Why might Yann Martel have chosen the name Richard Parker for this tiger, and this novel? Discuss the importance of names, and naming, in Life of Pi.

Editorial Reviews

"Yann Martel's Life of Pi (Canongate) is another reminder of the largely unsung excellence of the Canongate list. The fiercely independent Scottish outfit remains an outpost of rare quality and distinction, and this exceptional understated novel is certainly a worthy addition to its output.... It would not be out of place on a Booker shortlist." -- From The Bookseller“In the end, Life of Pi may not, as its teller promises, persuade readers to believe in God, but it makes a fine argument for the divinity of good art.” -- Noel Rieder, The Gazette (Montreal)“Martel’s latest literary offering, Life of Pi, is an exquisitely crafted tale that could be described as a castaway adventure story cum allegory.” -- The Gazette (Montreal)“Life of Pi…is about many things -- religion, zoology, fear -- but most of all, it’s about sheer tenacity. Martel has created a funny, wise and highliy original look at what it means to be human.” -- Chatelaine“In many ways, Life of Pi is a good old-fashioned boy’s book full of survival, cannibalism, horror, math and zoology. An impressive marriage of The Jungle Book with Lord of the Flies, it’s the harrowing coming of age tale of a boy who survives for over a year in a lifeboat with a zebra, an organgutan, an hyena and a Bengal tiger.” -- The Montreal Mirror“A good story can make you see, understand and believe, and Martel is a very good storyteller. Martel displays an impresive knowledge of language, history, religion and literature, and his writing is filled with details and insights.” -- The Canadian Press“[Life of Pi] has a buoyant, exotic, insistence reminiscent of Edgar Allen Poe’s most Gothic fiction…Oddities abound and the storytelling is first-rate. Yann Martel has written a novel full of grisly reality, outlandish plot, inventive setting and thought-provoking questions about the value and purpose of fiction. This novel should float.” -- The Edmonton Journal“I guarantee that you will not be able to put this book down. It is a realistic, gripping story of survival at sea. On one level, the book is a suspenseful adventure story, a demonstration of how extreme need alters a man’s character…. On another level, this is a profound meditation on the role of religion in human life and the nature of animals, wild and human. His language…is vivid and striking. His imagination if powerful, his range enormous, his capacity for persuasion almost limitless. I predict that Yann Martel will develop into one of Canada’s great writers." -- The Hamilton Spectator“[M]artel’s writing is so original you might think he wants you to read as if, like a perfect snowflake, no other book had ever had this form…. In Pi one gleans that faith -- one of the most ephemeral emotions, yet crucial whenever life is one the line -- is rooted in the will to live. In any event, when Pi does come to the end of his journey, he has it.” -- National Post“[A]stounding and beautiful…The book is a pleasure not only for the subtleties of its philosophy but also for its ingenious and surprising story. Martel is a confident, heartfelt artist, and his imagination is cared for in a writing style that is both unmistakable and marvelously reserved. The ending of Life of Pi…is a show of such sophisticated genius that I could scarcely keep my eyes in my head as I read it.” -- The Vancouver Sun"A fabulous romp through an imagination by turns ecstatic, cunning, despairing and resilient, this novel is an impressive achievement -- "a story that will make you believe in God," as one character says.... This richly patterned work, Martel's second novel, won Canada's 2001 Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction . In it, Martel displays the clever voice and tremendous storytelling skills of an emerging master.FYI: Booksellers would be wise to advise readers to browse through Martel's introductory note. His captivating honesty about the genesis of his story is almost worth the price of the book itself." -- Publisher's Weekly