Lincoln and His Admirals

Paperback | October 29, 2010

byCraig L. Symonds

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Abraham Lincoln began his presidency admitting that he knew "but little of ships," but he quickly came to preside over the largest national armada to that time, not eclipsed until World War I. Written by naval historian Craig L. Symonds, Lincoln and His Admirals unveils an aspect of Lincoln'spresidency unexamined by historians until now, revealing how he managed the men who ran the naval side of the Civil War, and how the activities of the Union Navy ultimately affected the course of history. Beginning with a gripping account of the attempt to re-supply Fort Sumter - a comedy of errors that shows all too clearly the fledgling president's inexperience - Symonds traces Lincoln's steady growth as a wartime commander-in-chief. Absent a Secretary of Defense, he would eventually become defacto commander of joint operations along the coast and on the rivers. That involved dealing with the men who ran the Navy: the loyal but often cranky Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, the quiet and reliable David G. Farragut, the flamboyant and unpredictable Charles Wilkes, the ambitious ordnanceexpert John Dahlgren, the well-connected Samuel Phillips Lee, and the self-promoting and gregarious David Dixon Porter. Lincoln was remarkably patient; he often postponed critical decisions until the momentum of events made the consequences of those decisions evident. But Symonds also shows thatLincoln could act decisively. Disappointed by the lethargy of his senior naval officers on the scene, he stepped in and personally directed an amphibious assault on the Virginia coast, a successful operation that led to the capture of Norfolk. The man who knew "but little of ships" had transformedhimself into one of the greatest naval strategists of his age. Co-winner of the 2009 Lincoln PrizeWinner of the 2009 Barondess/Lincoln Prize by the Civil War Round Table of New YorkJohn Lyman Award of the North American Society for Oceanic HistoryDaniel and Marilyn Laney Prize by the Austin Civil War Round TableNevins-Freeman Prize of the Civil War Round Table of Chicago

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Abraham Lincoln began his presidency admitting that he knew "but little of ships," but he quickly came to preside over the largest national armada to that time, not eclipsed until World War I. Written by naval historian Craig L. Symonds, Lincoln and His Admirals unveils an aspect of Lincoln'spresidency unexamined by historians until n...

Craig L. Symonds is Professor Emeritus at the U.S. Naval Academy and the author of ten previous books, including Decision at Sea: Five Naval Battles that Shaped American History, which won the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Prize in 2006.

other books by Craig L. Symonds

The Battle of Midway
The Battle of Midway

Hardcover|Oct 19 2011

$25.71 online$30.95list price(save 16%)
see all books by Craig L. Symonds
Format:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 6.1 × 9.29 × 1.18 inPublished:October 29, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199751579

ISBN - 13:9780199751570

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgementsIntroduction1861: Getting Under Way1. "What Have I Done Wrong?" Lincoln and the Fort Sumter Crisis2. "A Competent Force" Lincoln and the Blockade3. "No Affront to the British Flag" Lincoln and the Trent Affair1862: Charting a Course4. "I Wont Leave Off Until It Fairly Rains Bombs" Lincoln and the River War5. "It Strikes Me There's Something In It" Lincoln and the Monitor6. "We Cannot Escape History" Lincoln and the Contraband1863: Troubled Waters7. "The Peninsula All Over Again" Lincoln, Charleston, and Vicksburg8. "I Shall Have to Cut This Knot" Lincoln as Adjudicator9. "Peace Does Not Appear So Distant as it Did" Lincoln and Wartime Politics1864: Full Speed Ahead10. "It Becomes Immensely Important to Us to Get the Cotton" Lincoln and the Red River Campaign11. "A Vote of Thanks" Lincoln and the Politics of Promotion12. "I Must Refer You to General Grant" Lincoln and the Fort Fisher Expedition1865: Final HarborEpilogue: "Thank God I Have Lived to See This"Abbreviations Used in NotesNotesBibliographyIndex