Literature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain: From Mary Shelley to George Eliot by Janis McLarren CaldwellLiterature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain: From Mary Shelley to George Eliot by Janis McLarren Caldwell

Literature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain: From Mary Shelley to George Eliot

byJanis McLarren Caldwell

Paperback | June 19, 2008

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Janis Caldwell investigates the links between the growing scientific materialism of the nineteenth century and the persistence of the Romantic literary imagination. Through closely analyzing literary texts from Frankenstein to Middlemarch, and examining fiction alongside biomedical lectures, textbooks and articles, Caldwell argues that the way "Romantic materialism" influenced these disciplines compels us to revise conventional accounts of the relationship between literature and medicine.
Title:Literature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain: From Mary Shelley to George EliotFormat:PaperbackDimensions:220 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:June 19, 2008Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521066670

ISBN - 13:9780521066679

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction: Romantic materialism; 2. Science and sympathy in Frankenstein; 3. Natural supernaturalism in Thomas Carlyle and Richard Owen; 4. Wuthering Heights and domestic medicine: the child's body and the book; 5. Literalization in the novels of Charlotte Brontë; 6. Charles Darwin and Romantic medicine; 7. Middlemarch and the medical case report: the patient's narrative and the physical exam; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"With this monograph, Janis McLarren Caldwell makes an important contribution to literature and medicine studies...Her insights are astute, generous, and never overly clever or self-aggrandizing."
Stephanie P. Browner, Berea College, Studies in the Novel