Literature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820 by Robin ValenzaLiterature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820 by Robin Valenza

Literature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820

byRobin Valenza

Paperback | November 24, 2011

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The divide between the sciences and the humanities, which often seem to speak entirely different languages, has its roots in the way intellectual disciplines developed in the long eighteenth century. As various fields of study became defined and to some degree professionalized, their ways of communicating evolved into an increasingly specialist vocabulary. Chemists, physicists, philosophers, and poets argued about whether their discourses should become more and more specialised, or whether they should aim to remain intelligible to the layperson. In this interdisciplinary 2009 study, Robin Valenza shows how Isaac Newton, Samuel Johnson, David Hume, Adam Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth invented new intellectual languages. By offering a much-needed account of the rise of the modern disciplines, Robin Valenza shows why the sciences and humanities diverged so strongly, and argues that literature has a special role in navigating between the languages of different areas of thought.
Title:Literature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820Format:PaperbackDimensions:250 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:November 24, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521369959

ISBN - 13:9780521369954

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Table of Contents

1. The economies of knowledge; 2. The learned and conversible worlds; 3. Physics and its audiences; 4. Philosophy's place between science and literature; 5. Poetry among the intellectual disciplines; Coda: common sense and common language; Works cited; Index.

Editorial Reviews

Review of the hardback: 'Her lively, lucid explorations of Newtonian science, Scottish philosophy and Romantic poetics offer some provocative new perspectives on the organisation of knowledge in the long eighteenth century; they also invite her academic readers to temper the scepticism of the specialist with the more conversible qualities of intellectual agility and lightly worn eclecticism.' Review of English Studies