Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799 by P. Mcphee

Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799

byP. Mcphee

Paperback | October 10, 2006

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What did it mean to live through the French Revolution? This volume provides a coherent and expansive portrait of revolutionary life by exploring the lived experience of the people of France's villages and country towns, revealing how The Revolution had a dramatic impact on daily life from family relations to religious practices.

About The Author

PETER MCPHEE holds a Personal Chair in History at the University of Melbourne, Australia. He has published widely on the history of modern France, most recently Revolution and Environment in Southern France, 1780-1830 (1999), The French Revolution 1789-1799 (2002) and A Social History of France 1789-1914 (2003).
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Details & Specs

Title:Living the French Revolution, 1789-1799Format:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.03 inPublished:October 10, 2006Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230574750

ISBN - 13:9780230574755

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Describing the Old Regime
Elation and Anxiety: The Revolutionary Year
Reimagining Space and Power, 1789-91
Without Christ or King, 1791
Deadly Divisions, 1791-92
In the Fires of War, 1792-93
The Experience of Terror, 1793-94
Settling Scores: The Thermidorian Reaction, 1794-95
A New Regime and its Discontents, 1795-99
Conclusion: A Revolution for the People?