Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020-1220

Paperback | July 18, 2012

byElaine Treharne

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Oxford Textual Perspectives is a new series of informative and provocative studies focused upon literary texts (conceived of in the broadest sense of that term) and the technologies, cultures and communities that produce, inform, and receive them. It provides fresh interpretations offundamental works and of the vital and challenging issues emerging in English literary studies. By engaging with the materiality of the literary text, its production, and reception history, and frequently testing and exploring the boundaries of the notion of text itself, the volumes in the seriesquestion familiar frameworks and provide innovative interpretations of both canonical and less well-known works.Living through Conquest is the first ever investigation of the political clout of English from the reign of Cnut to the earliest decades of the thirteenth century. It focuses on why and how the English language was used by kings and their courts and by leading churchmen and monastic institutions atkey moments from 1020 to 1220. English became the language of choice of a usurper king; the language of collective endeavour for preachers and prelates; and the language of resistance and negotiation in the post-Conquest period. Analysing texts that are not widely known, such as Cnut's two Lettersto the English of 1020 and 1027, Worcester's Confraternity Agreement, and the Eadwine Psalter, alongside canonical writers like AElfric and Wulfstan, Elaine Treharne demonstrates the ideological significance of the native vernacular and its social and cultural relevance alongside Latin, and later,French. While many scholars to date have seen the period from 1060 to 1220 as a literary lacuna as far as English is concerned, this book demonstrates unequivocally that the hundreds of vernacular works surviving from this period attest to a lively and rich textual tradition. Living Through Conquestaddresses the political concerns of English writers and their constructed audiences, and investigates the agenda of manuscript producers, from those whose books were very much in the vein of earlier English codices to those innovators who employed English precisely to demonstrate its contemporaneityin a multitude of contexts and for a variety of different audiences.

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Oxford Textual Perspectives is a new series of informative and provocative studies focused upon literary texts (conceived of in the broadest sense of that term) and the technologies, cultures and communities that produce, inform, and receive them. It provides fresh interpretations offundamental works and of the vital and challenging is...

Elaine Treharne is Professor of Early English at Florida State University and Visiting Professor of Medieval Literature at the University of Leicester. She is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and of the Royal Historical Society, and a Trustee of the English Association. She is series editor of the English Association's Essays and...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 7.99 × 5.31 × 0.68 inPublished:July 18, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199585261

ISBN - 13:9780199585267

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Table of Contents

List of PlatesIntroduction: 'Their dialect, proverbs and songs': the Context of Conquest1. 'And change may be good or evil': the Process of Conquest2. 'Some would drink and deny it, and some would pray and atone': the Propaganda of Conquest3. 'The end of that game is oppression and shame': the Silence of Conquest4. 'Shame and Wrath had the Saxons': the Trauma of Conquest5. 'The Saxon is not like us Normans': the Writing of Conquest6. 'A nice little handful it is': the Remains of Conquest7. 'This isn't fair dealing': the Unity of Conquest8. 'Let them know that you know what they're saying': a Truth of ConquestBibliographyIndex