Looking for Old Ontario by Thomas McIlwraithLooking for Old Ontario by Thomas McIlwraith

Looking for Old Ontario

byThomas McIlwraith

Paperback | May 24, 1997

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The slogan on Ontario's licence plates, 'Yours to Discover,' was designed to promote travel opportunities within the province. Every year, thousands of tourists drive along country roads, past farmyards and through hamlets, en route to popular vacation spots. In Looking for Old Ontario, Thomas McIlwraith shows that many destinations are closer at hand than one might imagine, and invites travellers to rediscover familiar countryside landmarks by 'reading' them as chapters in a rich historical narrative. Surveyors long ago scored Ontario's land, and generations have since inscribed it with residences, businesses, and institutions. This book, the result of thirty years of field work and archival research, is a reflection on and an interpretation of the ways in which the land and its inhabitants interrelate.

Looking for Old Ontario guides readers through the vernacular landscape of the province, examining barns, fences, jails, post offices, inns, mills, canals, railways, roadsides, cemeteries, and much more. McIlwraith emphasizes ordinary features of the cultural landscape which communicate social meaning to the observant eye. The landscape tells us that Ontario has been inhabited by thrifty people; this we can conclude by looking at the economical use and reuse of construction materials. Yet the landscape also tells us that Ontario's residents have been inclined to show off: consider the province's unusually large number of elegant brick dwellings. To read a landscape is to think about such connections, and McIlwraith's contemplative style differentiates his work from manuals or handbooks.

Since landscape interpretation is a highly visual subject, Looking for Old Ontario is extensively illustrated with photographs, drawings, and maps. It will be useful to general readers interested in recognizing the broader meanings of their communities' heritage, as well as to students of geography, history, and planning.

Thomas F. McIlwraith is a professor in the Department of Geography at Erindale College, University of Toronto. He is a member of the original Organizing Committee and served as co-ordinator for the Concise Historical Atlas of Canada. He is the author of Looking for Old Ontario.
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Title:Looking for Old OntarioFormat:PaperbackDimensions:360 pages, 9.75 × 6.73 × 1.03 inPublished:May 24, 1997Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802076580

ISBN - 13:9780802076588

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for anyone who enjoy's the Ontario countryside I was fortunate enough to have attended Dr. McIIwraith's course, Old Ontario, when I was studying at U of T, and this book nicely complies the theme's of the course in an interesting and insightful format. Anyone who enjoys spending a day travelling around Ontario's rural areas will enjoy this book and find it a handy reference for years to come.
Date published: 2016-09-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Looking for Old Ontario I found this to be a fascinating reference book. I am affiliated with the Wallaceburg Museum and Historical Society and have drawn on the information contained in this great book. I learned a lot and now have a totally different view of the countryside.
Date published: 1999-01-07

From Our Editors

Learn how to 'read' familiar countryside landmarks in Looking for Old Ontario: Two Centuries of Landscape Change. Thomas McIlwraith draws on 30 years of fieldwork and archival research to interpret 200 hundred years of interaction between the land and its inhabitants. Discover how the most ordinary features of the cultural landscape can communicate social meaning in this extensively illustrated guidebook.

Editorial Reviews

"McIlwraith has written an excellent regional landscape analysis from a cultural geographer's perspective. He makes a concerted effort to link the material culture of Ontario with its evolution as a settled environment. Through an understanding of how the landscape has changed over time, present-day citizens can contribute to a dynamic process; every citizen who lives in the region is a beneficiary.' - G. Jeane, Samford University - Choice