Los Angeles in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the City of Angels by Federal Writers Project oLos Angeles in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the City of Angels by Federal Writers Project o

Los Angeles in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the City of Angels

byFederal Writers Project oIntroduction byDavid Kipen

Paperback | April 5, 2011

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Los Angeles in the 1930sreturns to print an invaluable document of Depression-era Los Angeles, illuminating a pivotal moment in L.A.’s history, when writers like Raymond Chandler, Nathanael West, and F. Scott Fitzgerald were creating the images and associations#151;and the mystique#151;for which the City of Angels is still known. Many books in one,Los Angeles in the 1930sis both a genial guide and an addictively readable history, revisiting the Spanish colonial period, the Mexican period, the brief California Republic, and finally American sovereignty. It is also a compact coffee table book of dazzling monochrome photography. These whose haunting visions suggest the city we know today and illuminate the booms and busts that marked L.A.’s past and continue to shape its future.
The Federal Writers Project (FWP)of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) not only provided jobs and income to writers during the Depression, it created for America an astounding series of detailed and richly evocative guides, recounting the stories and histories of the 48 states (plus Alaska Territory and Puerto Rico) and many of th...
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Title:Los Angeles in the 1930s: The WPA Guide to the City of AngelsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:504 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 1.32 inPublished:April 5, 2011Publisher:University of California PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0520268830

ISBN - 13:9780520268838

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Editorial Reviews

“More than just a tool to help you find the nearest Presbyterian church or a convenient tennis court, the guides, part of the Depression-era Federal Writers Project, included thoughtful essays on history, life and culture in each destination, as well as blow-by-blow tours through city neighborhoods and other information that in many cases remains at least partially relevant (or interesting) today.“