Lost In The Sun

Paperback | April 26, 2016

byLisa Graff

not yet rated|write a review
From the author of A Tangle of Knots and Absolutely Almost, a touching story about a boy who won't let one tragic accident define him.

Everyone says that middle school is awful, but Trent knows nothing could be worse than the year he had in fifth grade, when a freak accident on Cedar Lake left one kid dead, and Trent with a brain full of terrible thoughts he can't get rid of. Trent’s pretty positive the entire disaster was his fault, so for him middle school feels like a fresh start, a chance to prove to everyone that he's not the horrible screw-up they seem to think he is. 
 
If only Trent could make that fresh start happen.
 
It isn’t until Trent gets caught up in the whirlwind that is Fallon Little—the girl with the mysterious scar across her face—that things begin to change. Because fresh starts aren’t always easy. Even in baseball, when a fly ball gets lost in the sun, you have to remember to shift your position to find it.

Praise for Lost in the Sun:
 
Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year!
 
* "Graff writes with stunning insight [and] consistently demonstrates why character-driven novels can live from generation to generation."--Kirkus Reviews *STARRED*

* "Graff creates layered, vulnerable characters that are worth getting to know."--Booklist *STARRED*

* "[A]n ambitious and gracefully executed story."--Publishers Weekly *STARRED*
    
* "Weighty matters deftly handled with humor and grace will give this book wide appeal."--School Library Journal *STARRED*
 
* "Characterization is thoughtful."--BCCB *STARRED*
 
“In Lost in the Sun, Trent decides that he will speak the truth: that pain and anger and loss are not the final words, that goodness can find us after all—even when we hide from it.  This is a novel that speaks powerfully, honestly, almost shockingly about our human pain and our human redemption.  This book will change you.”—Gary Schmidt, two-time Newbery Honor-winning author of The Wednesday Wars and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy
 
“Lisa Graff crafts a compelling story about a boy touched with tragedy and the world of people he cares about.  And like all the best stories, it ends at a new beginning.”—Richard Peck, Newbery Award-winning author of A Year Down Yonder and A Long Way From Chicago
 
 
Lisa Graff's Awards and Reviews:
 
Lisa Graff's books have been named to 30 state award lists, and A Tangle of Knots was long-listed for the National Book Award.


From the Hardcover edition.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$11.96 online
$11.99 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25
Prices may vary. why?
Please call ahead to confirm inventory.

From the Publisher

From the author of A Tangle of Knots and Absolutely Almost, a touching story about a boy who won't let one tragic accident define him. Everyone says that middle school is awful, but Trent knows nothing could be worse than the year he had in fifth grade, when a freak accident on Cedar Lake left one kid dead, and Trent with a brain full ...

Lisa Graff (www.lisagraff.com) is the critically acclaimed and award-winning author of the National Book Award nominee A Tangle of Knots, as well as Absolutely Almost, Double Dog Dare, Umbrella Summer, The Life and Crimes of Bernetta Wallflower,The Thing About Georgie and Sophie Simon Solves Them All.  Originally from California, she l...

other books by Lisa Graff

Absolutely Almost
Absolutely Almost

Paperback|May 5 2015

$9.73 online$11.99list price(save 18%)
A Tangle Of Knots
A Tangle Of Knots

Paperback|Feb 11 2014

$10.67 online$11.99list price(save 11%)
see all books by Lisa Graff
Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 7.75 × 5.06 × 0.76 inPublished:April 26, 2016Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0147508584

ISBN - 13:9780147508584

Customer Reviews of Lost In The Sun

Reviews

Extra Content

Read from the Book

PrologueWhen we were real little kids, Mom used to take Aaron and Doug and me to Sal’s Pizzeria for dinner almost every Tuesday, which is when they had their Family Night Special. I think she liked it because she didn’t have to worry about dinner for three growing boys for one night, but we liked it because there was a claw machine there—one of those giant contraptions with toys inside, all sorts, and a metal claw that you moved around with a joystick to try to grab at the toys. As soon as we got into the restaurant, Mom would hand us two dollars, which is how much it cost for three tries, and we’d huddle around the machine and plan our attack. We didn’t want to waste that two dollars, so we usually took the whole amount of time until our pizza came up, trying to get one of those toys (back then, I had my eye on a fuzzy blue monster, and Doug was desperate for one of the teddy bears, but after a while we would’ve settled for anything). Aaron, as the oldest, was the designated joystick manipulator, and Doug, the youngest, would stand at the side and holler when he thought Aaron had the best angle on the chosen toy. I was in charge of strategy.Mom would sit at the table, waiting for our pizza, and read her book. I think she enjoyed the claw machine even more than we did.We spent six months trying for a toy in that claw machine. Forty-eight dollars. Never got a single thing. No one else had gotten one either, we could tell. None of the stuffed animals ever shifted position. But we were determined to be the first.Finally the owner, Sal Jr., made us stop. He said he couldn’t in good conscience let us waste any more money. Then he got a key from the back room, and unlocked the side window panel of the claw machine, and showed us.“See how flimsy this thing is?” he said, poking at the claw. “Here, Trent, have a look.” He boosted me up, till I was practically inside the machine, and let me fiddle with the claw, too. After that it was Doug’s turn, then Aaron’s. “A cheap piece of metal like that,” Sal Jr. told us, “it could never grab hold of one of these toys. Not if you had the best aim in the world. Not in a thousand years. And you know why?”“Why?” I asked. I was mesmerized. I remember.“I’ll tell you, Trent. Because, look.” That’s when Sal Jr. grabbed hold of the teddy bear’s arm. Yanked it hard.It wouldn’t budge. You could hear the seams in the bear’s stitching rip, just a little.“They’re all packed in together super tight,” I said when I figured it out. “There’s no room for any of them to go.”“Exactly,” Sal Jr. told me. He locked the side window panel back up. “Consider that a lesson in economics, boys.”We got two pizzas on the house that night, with extra everything.Aaron was so mad about the claw machine, he hardly ate. He said Sal Jr. had been stealing our money from the start, so it didn’t matter if he gave us pizza after, he was still a crook. Doug disagreed. He gobbled up his pizza so fast, you’d never even have known he wanted a teddy bear.Me, though, I was more fascinated than anything. I felt like I’d learned a real lesson, a grown-up one, and it stuck with me. That’s the day I figured out that no matter how hard you tug at something, no matter how bad you want it, sometimes it just can’t be pried free.I thought about that claw machine a lot after Jared died. Because there were days—who am I kidding, every day was one of those days—when I wished I could lift that moment out of my life, just scoop it up with an industrial-sized claw, and toss it into a metal bin. Remove it from existence, so that it never happened at all.But I knew that wasn’t something I could ever do—and not just because I didn’t have a magic claw machine with the power to erase events from history. No, I knew I could never disappear that moment, because just like with the claw machine, there were so many events pushed up around it that there’d be no way to get it to budge. Everything that had happened before, and everything that happened after, those moments were all linked. Smushed together.Still, I couldn’t help thinking that if I had it to do over, I never would’ve hit that hockey puck.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for LOST IN THE SUN:A Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year! * "Graff writes with stunning insight into boyhood and humanity, allowing Trent to speak for himself in a pained, honest narration. Investing Trent with all the tragic frailty of Holden Caulfield, Graff tackles issues of loss, isolation, and rage without apology. Graff consistently demonstrates why character-driven novels can live from generation to generation, and here she offers a story that can survive for many school years to come."--Kirkus Reviews *STARRED** "Graff creates layered, vulnerable characters that are worth getting to know and routing for. Narrated by the moody, sarcastic Trent, the story never buckles beneath his troubles, and it finds wings once he can see beyond them. Pranks, The Sandlot reenactments, sports talk, and donuts are in plentiful supply, adding dashes of levity at the right moments. The book’s real magic is found in simple acts like watering plants and learning when to listen and when to just tip your head back and scream at the sky."--Booklist *STARRED*  * "In an ambitious and gracefully executed story, Graff covers a lot of emotional ground, empathically tracing Trent’s efforts to deal with a horrible, inexplicable accident and to heal the relationships that have become collateral damage along the way."--Publishers Weekly *STARRED*    * "Weighty matters deftly handled with humor and grace will give this book wide appeal."--School Library Journal *STARRED* * "Characterization is thoughtful: Graff is highly sensitive to a sixth-grade boy’s limited emotional savvy and lack of tools to deal with this kind of pain."--BCCB *STARRED*“In Lost in the Sun, Trent decides that he will speak the truth: that pain and anger and loss are not the final words, that goodness can find us after all—even when we hide from it.  This is a novel that speaks powerfully, honestly, almost shockingly about our human pain and our human redemption.  This book will change you.”—Gary Schmidt, two-time Newbery Honor-winning author of The Wednesday Wars and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy   “Lisa Graff crafts a compelling story about a boy touched with tragedy and the world of people he cares about.  And like all the best stories, it ends at a new beginning.”—Richard Peck, Newbery Award-winning author of A Year Down Yonder and A Long Way From ChicagoFrom the Hardcover edition.