Lost!

Paperback | July 11, 2003

IllustratorDaniel MoretonbyAlex Moran

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Gil the ant can't figure out where he is! But Gil - and clever readers - will pick up clues so that he won't be lost for long. Daniel Moreton's pictures add a high-tech twist to this companion to What Day Is It?

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From the Publisher

Gil the ant can't figure out where he is! But Gil - and clever readers - will pick up clues so that he won't be lost for long. Daniel Moreton's pictures add a high-tech twist to this companion to What Day Is It?

Alex Moran is a published children's author. Daniel Moreton has illustrated and written many books for children including I Knew Two Who Said Moo. Mr. Moreton is an art director and lives in New York City.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:24 pages, 8.5 × 6.1 × 0.1 inPublished:July 11, 2003Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0152048642

ISBN - 13:9780152048648

Appropriate for ages: 4

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Editorial Reviews

Kindergarten-Grade 1-In the first book, Dad has lost his hat, Mom has lost a pin, and Pat has lost a toy frog. They look all through the house, but cannot find the missing things anywhere. When the family dog starts digging in the yard, they discover his "secret spot" and all of their possessions. Cepeda's bright, chunky illustrations portray an African-American family's amusement and surprise when they solve the mystery. In Lost!, a red ant feels water on his head and climbs up a tall pole (a straw), only to discover that he is in a sink filled with dishes. From there, he crawls around a house until, at last, he makes his way home to his friends. The computer-generated art is brightly colored and somewhat reminiscent of the animation in the movie Antz. The short, simple sentences and large-type texts are suitable for beginning readers, though both of these stories are slight and predictable and the artwork lacks the visual clues that new readers need.Joyce Rice, Limestone Creek Elementary School, Jupiter, FL