Love and Fatigue in America

Paperback | February 20, 2014

byRoger King

not yet rated|write a review
When an Englishman receives an invitation from an American university, he embraces it as a jubilant new beginning. Instead, on arrival, he is stricken with a persistent inability to stand up or think straight. Diagnosed with ME disease—also called chronic fatigue syndrome—he moves restlessly across his newly adopted country, searching for a love and a life suited to his new condition. Love and Fatigue in America briskly compresses an illness, a nation, and an era in a masterly blend of literary forms.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$25.77 online
$25.95 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

When an Englishman receives an invitation from an American university, he embraces it as a jubilant new beginning. Instead, on arrival, he is stricken with a persistent inability to stand up or think straight. Diagnosed with ME disease—also called chronic fatigue syndrome—he moves restlessly across his newly adopted country, searching ...

Roger King is the author of four previous novels: Horizontal Hotel, Written on a Stranger’s Map, Sea Level, and A Girl from Zanzibar. Since 1991 he has suffered from ME disease. A native of London, he lives in Leverett, Massachusetts.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:284 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.8 inPublished:February 20, 2014Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299287246

ISBN - 13:9780299287245

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Love and Fatigue in America

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Author’s Note
Washington State, 1900–1991 
New Mexico, 1991–1994
California 1994–1997
Other States, 1997
Massachusetts, 1997–
Acknowledgments

Editorial Reviews

A painfully beautiful book. It’s also gloriously sexy and . . . among the finest depictions of queer life in 1990s San Francisco.  Poetic, tragic, and often euphoric, it’s the kind of story that I found myself wanting to live inside of.”—The Gay and Lesbian Review