Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle

Paperback | March 1, 1994

byA. W. Price

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Reissued in 1997 with corrections and a new Afterword, this book fully explores for the first time an idea common to Plato and Aristotle, which unites their treatments - otherwise very different - of love and friendship. The idea is that although persons are separate, their lives need not be.One person's life may overflow into another's, and as such, helping another person is a way of serving oneself. The author shows how their view of love and friendship, within not only personal relationships, but also the household and even the city-state, promises to resolve the old dichotomybetween egoism and altruism.

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Reissued in 1997 with corrections and a new Afterword, this book fully explores for the first time an idea common to Plato and Aristotle, which unites their treatments - otherwise very different - of love and friendship. The idea is that although persons are separate, their lives need not be.One person's life may overflow into another'...

A. W. Price is at University of York.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:286 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.71 inPublished:March 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198248997

ISBN - 13:9780198248996

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'Anthony Price has written a meticulous study of precisely what the title of his book indicates. Price's scholarship of classical and contemporary philosophical texts is admirable and his tireless energy in crafting highly nuanced, compressed, exegetical formulations is at times staggering.'Nancy Sherman, International Studies in Philosophy