Lucilius And Horace; A Study In The Classical Theory Of Imitation Volume 1

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byGeorge Converse Fiske

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...personification of the mutto by Lucilius in this immediate context. The actual words of Lucilius, as the parallels quoted by Marx prove, refer to masturbation, a practice approved by the Cynics. I turn next to a somewhat extended passage in Horace's satire, lines 86-95. Here Horace first describes the method employed by the shrewd buyer, on his guard against overvaluing a fine head and face alone, in appraising the "points" of a horse. Then in lines 93-95 the application of this illustration is made to the question of the "fine points" of a woman, especially to the danger of disillusion in the case of the matron, whose beauty of face alone is visible. Here Horace seems to have had in mind, and to have paraphrased certain passages from both the 7th and the 8th books of Lucilius. The Horatian passage is as follows: regibus hic mos est, ubi equos mercantur: opertos inspiciunt, ne si fades, ut saepe, decora molli fulta pede est, emptorem inducat hiantem, quod pulchrae clunes, breve quod caput, ardua cervix. hoc illi recte, ne corporis optima Lyncei contemplere oculis, Hypsaea caecior illa quae mala sunt spectes. 'o cms, o bracchial' verum depugis, nasuta, brevi latere ac pede 1ongost. matronae praeter faciem nil cernere possis, cetera, ni Catia est, demissa veste tegentis. The discussion on beauty of face was clearly found in Lucilius, book 7, as we may see from fragments 269 and 271. In fragment 269, a speaker presumably a lover, expresses his love for a girl addressed in the second person, shows that he is an admirer of her youthful beauty and face, and promises to be a lover: qui te diligat, aetatis facieque tuae se fautorem ostendat, fore amicum polliceatur. In line 271 the exact meaning of the simile is uncertain: aetatem et faciem, ut...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ...personification of the mutto by Lucilius in this immediate context. The actual words of Lucilius, as the parall...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.41 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217859933

ISBN - 13:9780217859936

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