Lyric and Labour in the Romantic Tradition: LYRIC & LABOUR IN THE ROMANTIC by Anne JanowitzLyric and Labour in the Romantic Tradition: LYRIC & LABOUR IN THE ROMANTIC by Anne Janowitz

Lyric and Labour in the Romantic Tradition: LYRIC & LABOUR IN THE ROMANTIC

byAnne JanowitzEditorMarilyn Butler, James Chandler

Paperback | November 17, 2005

Pricing and Purchase Info

$63.36

Earn 317 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

This book examines the legacy of Romantic poetics in the poetry produced in political movements during the nineteenth century. It argues that a communitarian tradition of poetry extending from the 1790s to William Morris in the 1890s learned from and incorporated elements of Romantic lyricism, and produced an ongoing and self-conscious tradition of radical poetics. The book includes new readings of familiar Romantic poets including Wordsworth and Shelley, and provides case studies of relatively unknown Chartist and Republican poets such as Ernest Jones and W.J. Linton.
Title:Lyric and Labour in the Romantic Tradition: LYRIC & LABOUR IN THE ROMANTICFormat:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:November 17, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521022967

ISBN - 13:9780521022965

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction: Romantic studies as a unified field; Part I. A Dialectic of Romanticism: 1. The communitarian lyric in the dialectic of Romanticism; 2. Ballad, lyrical ballad, lyric; 3. The sun and the tree: lyrics of liberty; Part II. Interventionist Poetics in the Tradition of Romanticism: 4. Allen Davenport on the threshold of Chartism; 5. The forms of Chartist poetry and poetics: 1838-46; 6. Labour's laureates: Allen Davenport, Thomas Cooper, and Ernest Jones in 1846; 7. W. J. Linton and William Morris: Republican and Socialist poetics; Conclusion; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Far more than just another excursus on proletarian poetry." Linda Dowling Studies in English Literature