Magazines And The Making Of Mass Culture In Japan by Amy Bliss Marshall

Magazines And The Making Of Mass Culture In Japan

byAmy Bliss Marshall

Hardcover | March 14, 2019

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Magazines and the Making of Mass Culture in Japan provides a detailed yet approachable analysis of the mechanisms central to the birth of mass culture in Japan by tracing the creation, production, and circulation of two critically important family magazines: Kingu (King) and Ie no hikari (Light of the Home). These magazines served to embed new instruments of mass communication and socialization within Japanese society and created mechanisms to facilitate the dissemination of hegemonic forms of discourse in the first half of the twentieth century. The amazing success of Kingu and Ie no hikari during the 1920s and 1930s not only established and normalized participation in a Japanese mass national audience – a community which had previously not existed – but also facilitated the rise of Japanese mass consumer culture in the postwar years.

Amy Bliss Marshall argues that the postwar mass national consumer in Japan is foreshadowed by the mass national audience created by family magazines of the interwar era. This book narrates the development of such publications, one explicitly capitalist and one outwardly agrarian, based on missions with an overarching desire to create a mass audience. Magazines and the Making of Mass Culture in Japan highlights the importance of the seemingly innocuous acts of mass leisure consumption of magazines and the goods advertised therein, aiding our understanding of the creation and direction of a new form of social participation and understanding – an essential part of not only the culture but also the politics of the interwar period.

Amy Bliss Marshall is an assistant professor of History and Asian Studies at Florida International University.
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Title:Magazines And The Making Of Mass Culture In JapanFormat:HardcoverProduct dimensions:240 pages, 9.25 X 6.25 X 1 inShipping dimensions:240 pages, 9.25 X 6.25 X 1 inPublished:March 14, 2019Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1487502869

ISBN - 13:9781487502867

Appropriate for ages: All ages

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From the Author

Magazines and the Making of Mass Culture in Japan provides a detailed yet approachable analysis of the mechanisms central to the birth of mass culture in Japan by tracing the creation, production, and circulation of two critically important family magazines: Kingu (King) and Ie no hikari (Light of the Home). These magazines served to embed new instruments of mass communication and socialization within Japanese society and created mechanisms to facilitate the dissemination of hegemonic forms of discourse in the first half of the twentieth century. The amazing success of Kingu and Ie no hikari during the 1920s and 1930s not only established and normalized participation in a Japanese mass national audience – a community which had previously not existed – but also facilitated the rise of Japanese mass consumer culture in the postwar years. Amy Bliss Marshall argues that the postwar mass national consumer in Japan is foreshadowed by the mass national audience created by family magazines of the interwar era. This book narrates the development of such publications, one explicitly capitalist and one outwardly agrarian, based on missions with an overarching desire to create a mass audience. Magazines and the Making of Mass Culture in Japan highlights the importance of the seemingly innocuous acts of mass leisure consumption of magazines and the goods advertised therein, aiding our understanding of the creation and direction of a new form of social participation and understanding – an essential part of not only the culture but also the politics of the interwar period.

Table of Contents

1. The Medium, the Message & the Masses: Understanding Japanese Family Magazines
2. The Splendid Power of Being in Perfect Harmony: How Two Publishers Made a Mass Japanese Audience
3. “We Came, We Saw, We Astonished:” How a Japanese Mass Was Won
4. Reading Together: How the Audience Participated
5. Learning to Consume: How Magazines Politicized Advertising

Editorial Reviews

“Magazines and the Making of Mass Culture in Japan gives us a rich picture of how two media conglomerates successfully shaped a national mass consumer culture during Japan’s descent into militarism and war. In different yet complementary ways, Kingu and Ie no hikari tapped into, and thereby reinforced, a moral-political milieu of aligning individual with national societal aspirations that created the illusion of social cohesion and cultural homogeneity.” - Franziska Seraphim, Department of History, Boston College