Magic's Reason: An Anthropology Of Analogy by Graham M. JonesMagic's Reason: An Anthropology Of Analogy by Graham M. Jones

Magic's Reason: An Anthropology Of Analogy

byGraham M. Jones

Hardcover | December 6, 2017

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In Magic’s Reason, Graham M. Jones tells the entwined stories of anthropology and entertainment magic. The two pursuits are not as separate as they may seem at first. As Jones shows, they not only matured around the same time, but they also shared mutually reinforcing stances toward modernity and rationality. It is no historical accident, for example, that colonial ethnographers drew analogies between Western magicians and native ritual performers, who, in their view, hoodwinked gullible people into believing their sleight of hand was divine.

Using French magicians’ engagements with North African ritual performers as a case study, Jones shows how magic became enshrined in anthropological reasoning. Acknowledging the residue of magic’s colonial origins doesn’t require us to dispense with it. Rather, through this radical reassessment of classic anthropological ideas, Magic’s Reason develops a new perspective on the promise and peril of cross-cultural comparison. 
Graham M. Jones is associate professor of anthropology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and author of Trade of the Tricks: Inside the Magician’s Craft.   
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Title:Magic's Reason: An Anthropology Of AnalogyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.7 inPublished:December 6, 2017Publisher:University of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:022651854X

ISBN - 13:9780226518541

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Table of Contents

List of Figures

Introduction: Dangerous Doubles
Chapter 1: The War on Miracles
Chapter 2: Disanalogy
Chapter 3: Conjuring Equivalences
Chapter 4: Counteranalogy
Chapter 5: An Anthropologist among the Spirits
Chapter 6: The Magic of Analogy
Chapter 7: Meta-Analogy, or, Once More with Meaning
Conclusion: Regimes of Enchantment

Acknowledgments
Notes
References
Index
 

Editorial Reviews

"Jones argues ‘magic’ has played a central role in anthropological theorizing, highlighting the supposed irrationalities of non-Western cultures…Jones extracts from this analysis a historical dialectic of analogy and disanalogy both within the magic institutions of single cultures and in comparisons between whole societies. An…excellent ethnohistory.”