Making a New Man: Ciceronian Self-Fashioning in the Rhetorical Works

Hardcover | March 15, 2005

byJohn Dugan

not yet rated|write a review
In Making a New Man John Dugan investigates how Cicero (106-43 BCE) uses his major treatises on rhetorical theory (De oratore, Brutus, and Orator) in order to construct himself as a new entity within Roman cultural life: a leader who based his authority upon intellectual, oratorical, andliterary accomplishments instead of the traditional avenues for prestige such as a distinguished familial pedigree or political or military feats. Eschewing conventional Roman notions of manliness, Cicero constructed a distinctly aesthetized identity that flirts with the questionable domains of thetheatre and the feminine, and thus fashioned himself as a `new man'.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$280.50 online
$390.00 list price (save 28%)
Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

In Making a New Man John Dugan investigates how Cicero (106-43 BCE) uses his major treatises on rhetorical theory (De oratore, Brutus, and Orator) in order to construct himself as a new entity within Roman cultural life: a leader who based his authority upon intellectual, oratorical, andliterary accomplishments instead of the tradition...

John Dugan is Assistant Professor in the Classics Department, State University of New York at Buffalo.

other books by John Dugan

The Healthy Penis and Naked Yoga
The Healthy Penis and Naked Yoga

Kobo ebook|Sep 6 2014

$0.00

Leadership Theory: Cultivating Critical Perspectives
Leadership Theory: Cultivating Critical Perspectives

Hardcover|Feb 6 2017

$89.99 online$90.00list price
see all books by John Dugan
Format:HardcoverDimensions:400 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 1.03 inPublished:March 15, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199267804

ISBN - 13:9780199267804

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Making a New Man: Ciceronian Self-Fashioning in the Rhetorical Works

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction1. Epideixis, Textuality, and Self-Fashioning in the Pro Archia and In Pisonem2. Fashioning the Ideal Orator: Theatricality and Transgressive Aesthetics in the De oratore1. `Writing' the Ideal Orator2. Julius Caesar Strabo and Cicero's Self-Fashioning through Transgressive Aesthetics3. Body and Style: Putting the Ideal Orator Together3. The Brutus: Cicero's `Rhetorical' History4. Caesarian Intertexts5. History, Irony, and Autobiography in the Brutus6. Varieties of Virtus: Brutus in the Brutus4. The Orator: Fashioning a Ciceronian Sublime7. The Orator's Intellectual, Personal, and Political Contexts8. Style and the Self, Text and the Body9. Making Your Mark: Written Ingenium in the Brutus and the OratorConclusion. Cicero and Demosthenes in `Longinus': The Ciceronian Sublime