Making Catfish Bait Out of Government Boys: The Fight against Cattle Ticks and the Transformation of the Yeoman South by Claire StromMaking Catfish Bait Out of Government Boys: The Fight against Cattle Ticks and the Transformation of the Yeoman South by Claire Strom

Making Catfish Bait Out of Government Boys: The Fight against Cattle Ticks and the Transformation…

byClaire Strom

Paperback | October 1, 2010

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This first full-length study of the cattle tick eradication program in the United States offers a new perspective on the fate of the yeomanry in the twentieth-century South during a period when state and federal governments were both increasing and centralizing their authority. As Claire Strom relates the power struggles that complicated efforts to wipe out the Boophilus tick, she explains the motivations and concerns of each group involved, including large- and small-scale cattle farmers, scientists, and officials at all levels of government.

In the remote rural South-such as the piney woods of south Georgia and north Florida-resistance to mandatory treatment of cattle was unusually strong and sometimes violent. Cattle often ranged free, and their owners raised them mostly for local use rather than faraway markets. Cattle farmers in such areas, shows Strom, perceived a double threat in tick eradication mandates. In addition to their added costs, eradication schemes, with their top-down imposition of government expertise, were anathema to the yeomanry’s notions of liberty.

Strom contextualizes her southern focus within the national scale of the cattle industry, discussing, for instance, the contentious place of cattle drives in American agricultural history. Because Mexico was the primary source of potential tick reinfestation, Strom examines the political and environmental history of the Rio Grande, giving the book a transnational perspective. Debates about the political and economic culture of small farmers have tended to focus on earlier periods in American history. Here Strom shows that pockets of yeoman culture survived into the twentieth century and that these communities had the power to block (if only temporarily) the expansion of the American state.

Claire Strom is Rapetti-Trunzo Professor of History at Rollins College and editor of the journal Agricultural History. She is the author of Profiting from the Plains: The Great Northern Railway and Corporate Development of the American West.
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Title:Making Catfish Bait Out of Government Boys: The Fight against Cattle Ticks and the Transformation…Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.7 inPublished:October 1, 2010Publisher:University Of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820336440

ISBN - 13:9780820336442

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
List of Maps
Foreword, by Paul S. Sutter
Preface

Introduction
Chapter 1. The Animals
Chapter 2. The Scientists
Chapter 3. The Yeomen
Chapter 4. The Counties
Chapter 5. The New South
Chapter 6. The State
Chapter 7. The Nation
Chapter 8. The World
Conclusion

Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

Making Catfish Bait out of Government Boys makes an important contribution to the agricultural, political, and cultural history of the South.

- Journal of Mississippi History