Making Globalization Good: The Moral Challenges of Global Capitalism

Paperback | November 4, 2004

EditorJohn H. Dunning

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Gordon Brown, Jonathan Sacks, Joseph Stiglitz, Hans Kung, Shirley Williams, and a dozen other leading thinkers in international business and ethics identify the pressing moral issues which global capitalism must answer.How can we develop a global economic architecture which is efficient, morally acceptable, geographically inclusive, and sustainable over time?If global capitalism -- arguably the most efficient wealth creating system currently known to man -- is to be both economically viable and socially acceptable, each of its four constituent institutions (markets, governments, supranational agencies, and civil society) must not only be technicallycompetent, but also be buttressed and challenged by a strong moral ethos.The book includes contributions from leading academics, politicians, and moralists. Recognizing that solutions will not come from any one quarter, and that any serious discussion of a just and equitable system will touch on questions of ethics and faith, the book approaches the issues from a rangeof different disciplines and forums.

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Gordon Brown, Jonathan Sacks, Joseph Stiglitz, Hans Kung, Shirley Williams, and a dozen other leading thinkers in international business and ethics identify the pressing moral issues which global capitalism must answer.How can we develop a global economic architecture which is efficient, morally acceptable, geographically inclusive, an...

Professor Dunning is Emeritus Professor of International Business at the University of Reading, and State of New Jersey Professor of International Business at Rutgers University, New Jersey. He has been researching into the economics of international direct investment and the multinational enterprise since the 1950s, and has authored,...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.91 inPublished:November 4, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019927522X

ISBN - 13:9780199275229

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Table of Contents

John H. Dunning: Introduction1. John H. Dunning: The Moral Imperatives of Global Capitalism: An overview2. Deepak Lal: Private Morality and Capitalism: Learning from the past3. Alan Hamlin: Institutions and Morality: An economist's appraisal4. Joseph Stiglitz: Towards a New Paradigm of Development5. Jack N. Behrman: Transformation of Society: Implications for globalization6. Shirley Williams: Global Social Justice: The moral responsibilities of the rich to the poor7. Hans Kung: The Ethical Framework of the Global Market Economy8. Brian Griffiths: The Challenge of Global Capitalism: A Christian perspective9. Khurshid Ahmad: The Challenge of Global Capitalism: An Islamic perspective10. Jonathan Sacks: Global Convenant: A Jewish perspective on globalization11. David R. Loy: The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The perspective of eastern religions12. Michael Novak: A Universal Culture of Human Rights and Freedom's Habits: Caritapolis13. Richard Falk: On the Political Relevance of Global Civil Society14. Robert Davies: [to be confirmed]15. Gordon Brown: Governments and Supranational Agencies16. John H. Dunning: Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

`The moral architecture of global capitalism is imperfect. The strength of the volume lies in the link made between ethics and globalizing capitalism with discussion of alternative approaches for action to promote a more effective and influential ecumenical dialogue. Each of the argumentspresented in the sixteen chapters is well developed, documented, and spot-on target.'Transnational Corporations