Making Minorities History: Population Transfer in Twentieth-Century Europe

Hardcover | June 22, 2017

byMatthew Frank

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Making Minorities History examines the various attempts made by European states over the course of the first half of the twentieth century, under the umbrella of international law and in the name of international peace and reconciliation, to rid the Continent of its ethnographic misfits andproblem populations. It is principally a study of the concept of "population transfer" - the idea that, in order to construct stable and homogeneous nation-states and a peaceful international order out of them, national minorities could be relocated en masse in an orderly way with minimal economicand political disruption as long as there was sufficient planning, bureaucratic oversight, and international support in place. Tracing the rise and fall of the concept from its emergence in the late 1890s through its 1940s zenith, and its geopolitical and historiographical afterlife during the Cold War, Making Minorities History explores the historical context and intellectual milieu in which population transfer developedfrom being initially regarded as a marginal idea propagated by a handful of political fantasists and extreme nationalists into an acceptable and a "progressive" instrument of state policy, as amenable to bourgeois democracies and Nobel Peace Prize winners as it was to authoritarian regimes andfascist dictators. In addition to examining the planning and implementation of population transfers, and in particular the diplomatic negotiations surrounding them, Making Minorities History looks at a selection of different proposals for the resettlement of minorities that came from individuals,organizations, and states during this era of population transfer.

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Making Minorities History examines the various attempts made by European states over the course of the first half of the twentieth century, under the umbrella of international law and in the name of international peace and reconciliation, to rid the Continent of its ethnographic misfits andproblem populations. It is principally a study...

Matthew Frank is Associate Professor in International History at the University of Leeds. He is a graduate of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London and St Antony's College, Oxford. He is the author of Expelling the Germans: British Opinion and Post-1945 Population Transfer in Context (2008) and has publ...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:464 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.98 inPublished:June 22, 2017Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199639442

ISBN - 13:9780199639441

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Table of Contents

Prologue: The Curious Case of Clarence C. Hatry: Financier, Frandster, and Migration ExpertIntroduction1. 'The Crazy Quilt of Peoples and Nationalities': Nation-States and National Minorities2. The Good Doctors: The League of Nations and the Internationalization of the Minorities Problem3. 'A New International Morality': European Dictatorships and the Reordering of Nationalities4. Defenders of Minorities: Liberal Internationalists, Jews, and Planning for the Brave New World5. Defenders of the State: Czechs, Eastern Measures, and European Exiles6. 'A Clean Sweep': The Grand Alliance and Population Transfer7. Accomplished Facts: Transfer and the Act of the Second World War8. A Paris Affair: The Post-War Limits of Population TransferAfterlives: Population Transfer in an Era of Human RightsConclusion