Malaria Capers by Robert S DesowitzMalaria Capers by Robert S Desowitz

Malaria Capers

byRobert S Desowitz

Paperback | June 1, 1993

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Why, Robert S. Desowitz asks, has biotechnical research on malaria produced so little when it had promised so much? An expert in tropical diseases, Desowtiz searches for answers in this provocative book.
Robert S. Desowitz, a leading epidemiologist, is the author of New Guinea Tape Worms and Jewish Grandmothers and The Malaria Capers, among other books. He lives in Pinehurst, North Carolina.
Title:Malaria CapersFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.75 inPublished:June 1, 1993Publisher:WW Norton

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393310086

ISBN - 13:9780393310085

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From Our Editors

Like such eminent science writers as Stephen Jay Gould and Lewis Thomas, Mr. Desowitz manages to make the basic principles of his subject immediately comprehensible to the general reader. He has also succeeded in giving us a profound appreciation of the ways in which scientific and medical knowledge advances, through hypothesis, error and experiment, through serendipity, dedication, and perseverance.

Editorial Reviews

Like such eminent science writers as Stephen Jay Gould and Lewis Thomas, Mr. Desowitz manages to make the basic principles of his subject immediately comprehensible to the general reader. He has also succeeded in giving us a profound appreciation of the ways in which scientific and medical knowledge advances, through hypothesis, error and experiment, through serendipity, dedication, and perseverance. — Michiko Kakutani (New York Times)Like a novelist, [Desowitz] draws the reader into the human tragedy of disease. . . . Rich in historical-medical detective stories. — Betty Ann Kevles (Los Angeles Times)A gripping account of how a one-celled protozoan has triumphed over modern science. — Wall Street Journal