Malcolm X Speaks

by .. Malcolm X

Pathfinder Press | January 1, 2008 | Hardcover

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Speeches from the last year of Malcolm X's life tracing the evolution of his views on racism, capitalism, socialism, political action, and more.

Foreword, eight-page photo section, index.


Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 275 pages, 8.64 × 5.59 × 0.85 in

Published: January 1, 2008

Publisher: Pathfinder Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0873485467

ISBN - 13: 9780873485463

Found in: People of Colour, Social and Cultural Studies

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– More About This Product –

Malcolm X Speaks

Malcolm X Speaks

by .. Malcolm X

Format: Hardcover

Dimensions: 275 pages, 8.64 × 5.59 × 0.85 in

Published: January 1, 2008

Publisher: Pathfinder Press

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0873485467

ISBN - 13: 9780873485463

From the Publisher

Speeches from the last year of Malcolm X's life tracing the evolution of his views on racism, capitalism, socialism, political action, and more.

Foreword, eight-page photo section, index.


About the Author

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, and the son of a Baptist minister, Malcolm Little grew up with violence. Whites killed several members of his family, including his father. As a youngster, he went to live with a sister in Boston where he started a career of crime that he continued in New York's Harlem as a drug peddler and pimp. While serving a prison term for burglary in 1952, he converted to Islam and undertook an intensive program of study and self-improvement, movingly detailed in "Autobiography of Malcolm X." He wrote constantly to Elijah Muhammad (Elijah Poole, 1897--1975), head of the black separatist Nation of Islam, which already claimed the loyalty of several of his brothers and sisters. Upon release from prison, Little went to Detroit, met with Elijah Muhammad, and dropped the last name Little, adopting X to symbolize the unknown African name his ancestors had been robbed of when they were enslaved. Soon he was actively speaking and organizing as a Muslim minister. In his angry and articulate preaching, he condemned white America for its treatment of blacks, denounced the integration movement as black self-delusion, and advocated black control of black communities. During the turbulent 1960's, he was seen as inflammatory and dangerous. In 1963, a storm broke out when he called President Kennedy's assassination a case of "chickens coming home to roost," meaning that white violence, long directed against blacks, had now turned on itself. The statement was received with fury,
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Editorial Reviews

“To understand this remarkable man, one must turn to Malcolm X Speaks.… All but one of the speeches were made in those last eight tumultuous months of his life after his break with the Black Muslims when he was seeking a new path. In their pages one can begin to understand his power as a speaker and to see, more clearly than in the Autobiography [of Malcolm X], the political legacy he left his people in its struggle for full emancipation … [This book] will have a permanent place in the literature of the Afro-American struggle.”—I.F. Stone in New York Review of Books