Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York City

Kobo ebook | October 2, 2012

byAgustín Laó-Montes, Arlene Dávila

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New York is the capital of mambo and a global factory of latinidad. This book covers the topic in all its multifaceted aspects, from Jim Crow baseball in the first half of the twentieth century to hip hop and ethno-racial politics, from Latinas and labor unions to advertising and Latino culture, from Cuban cuisine to the language of signs in New York City.

Together the articles map out the main conceptions of Latino identity as well as the historical process of Latinization of New York. Mambo Montage is both a way of imagining latinidad and an angle of vision on the city.

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New York is the capital of mambo and a global factory of latinidad. This book covers the topic in all its multifaceted aspects, from Jim Crow baseball in the first half of the twentieth century to hip hop and ethno-racial politics, from Latinas and labor unions to advertising and Latino culture, from Cuban cuisine to the language of si...

Agustín Laó-Montes is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Arlene Dávila is an assistant professor of anthropology at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico.

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Kobo ebook|Apr 19 2007

$46.19 online$59.99list price(save 23%)
Format:Kobo ebookPublished:October 2, 2012Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231505442

ISBN - 13:9780231505444

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Needless to say, this collection will find a respectable place within the booming cultural studies industry.



A brilliant political postmodernist take on the mambo. I find it essential.