Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay by Eric J. SargisMammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay by Eric J. Sargis

Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. Szalay

byEric J. SargisEditorMarian Dagosto

Hardcover | June 10, 2009

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Frederick S. Szalay is a commanding figure - one of those Frederick Sigmund Szalay was born in Hungary on peerless inimitable people that leave a lasting impression November 15, 1938. In many ways he was the product of however briefly they are encountered. Passionate and fear- the war-torn years of World War II where as a child he spent less, he approaches his work, as he does everything else in months forced to live in the cellars of Budapest while bombs his life, with great gusto and verve and expects everyone were falling. Towards the end of the war this was followed by around him to do the same. To have worked with him was street combat between the German and Soviet forces, which alternately a terror and a blessing, but was in any case truly he witnessed firsthand when he and other small rascals m- inspirational. Students and colleagues alike were apprehen- aged to sneak upstairs from the cellar. As a 6-year-old at the sive of his much renowned (but in reality rarely displayed and end of 1944, he helped his uncle and some friends coax an usually deserved) critiques, but therefore all the more appre- unexploded 500 lb bomb down the stairs from the third floor ciative of his generously given honest praise and unwavering of the house where they lived. Having to scavenge for food confidence and support.
Eric J. Sargis: (Ph.D., City University of New York [CUNY], a part of the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology [NYCEP]) is an Associate Professor of Anthropology. His dissertation research was on the functional postcranial morphology of treeshrews (Scandentia) and its significance for understanding primate supraordinal relat...
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Title:Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology: A Tribute to Frederick S. SzalayFormat:HardcoverDimensions:439 pagesPublished:June 10, 2009Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1402069960

ISBN - 13:9781402069963

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Section 1: Non-primate Mammals 1. Earliest evidence of Deltatheroida (Mammalia: Metatheria) from the Early Cretaceous of North America Brian M. Davis, Richard L. Cifelli, and Zofia Kielan-Jaworowska 2. Evolution of hind limb proportions in kangaroos (Marsupialia: Macropodoidea) Benjamin P. Kear, Michael S. Y. Lee, Wayne R. Gerdtz, and Tim F. Flannery 3. Changing views in paleontology: the story of a giant (Megatherium, Xenarthra) Christine Argot 4. Evolutionary morphology of the Tenrecoidea (Mammalia) forelimb skeleton Justine A. Salton and Eric J. Sargis 5. Postcranial morphology of Apheliscus and Haplomylus (Condylarthra, Apheliscidae): evidence for a Paleocene Holarctic origin of Macroscelidea Tonya A. Penkrot, Shawn P. Zack, Kenneth D. Rose, and Jonathan I. Bloch 6. Postcranial skeleton of the Upper Paleocene (Itaboraian) 'Condylarthra' (Mammalia) of the Itaboraí Basin, Brazil Lilian P. Berqvist 7. Postcranial osteology of mammals from Salla, Bolivia (late Oligocene): form, function, and phylogenetic implications Bruce J. Shockey and Frederico Anaya 8. Evolution of the proximal third phalanx in Oligocene-Miocene equids, and the utility of phalangeal indices in phylogeny reconstruction Jay A. O'Sullivan 9. Adaptive zones and the pinniped ankle: a three-dimensional quantitative analysis of carnivoran tarsal evolution P. David Polly Section 2: Primates 10. The biogeographic origins of Primates and Euprimates: East, West, North, or South of Eden? Mary T. Silcox 11. Evaluating the mitten-gliding hypothesis for Paromomyidae and Micromomyidae (Mammalia, 'Plesiadapiformes') using comparative functional morphology of new Paleogene skeletons Douglas M. Boyer and Jonathan I. Bloch 12. Morphological diversity in the skulls of large adapines (Primates, Adapiformes) and its systematic implications Marc Godinot and Sébastien Couette 13. Primate tibiae from the middle Eocene Shanghuang fissure-fillings of eastern China Marian Dagosto, Daniel L. Gebo, Xijun Ni, Tao Qi, and K. Christopher Beard 14. Rooneyia, postorbital closure, and the beginnings of the Age of Anthropoidea Alfred L. Rosenberger, Russell Hogg, and Sai Man Wong 15. Epitensoric position of the chorda tympani in Anthropoidea: a new synapomorphic character, with remarks on the fissura Glaseri in Primates Wolfgang Maier 16. Evolutionary morphology of the guenon postcranium and its taxonomic implications Eric J. Sargis, Carl J. Terranova, and Daniel L. Gebo 17. Analysis of selected hominoid joint surfaces using laser scanning and geometric morphometrics: a preliminary report William E. H. Harcourt-Smith, Melissa Tallman, Stephen R. Frost, David F. Wiley, F. James Rohlf, and Eric Delson 18. Comparative primate bone microstructure: records of life history, function, and phylogeny Johanna Warshaw

Editorial Reviews

From the reviews:"This festschrift is a wonderful tribute to the legacy Szalay, it should certainly find a place on the bookshelf of every student of mammalian evolution". Erik R. Seiffert, Journal of Human Evolution 59; 704-709, 2010 "This volume will have a place on my bookshelf because the chapters are all solid contributions. Many of them could have been stand-alone papers in other venues. Dagosto and Sargis categorized the topics where Szalay made his biggest contributions, then sought out papers from researchers currently working on those topics. In this regard, the festschrift for Szalay has become a book that does more than celebrate his accomplishments; it compiles research that would certainly stimulate his interest. The volume is made stronger by its idiosyncrasies, arguably a reflection of the live and the career to whom it is dedicated. This makes this volume, in my mind, an exceptional tribute to the contribution of true giants in their respective fields. The impact of Szalay is undeniable. The impact and longevity of this volume will follow suit." Christopher P. Heesy, Department of Anatomy, Midwestern University, Evolutionary Anthropology 18: 157-158, 2009 "This volume . is an extremely professional and well-produced book presenting up-to-date and cutting-edge research. . The book is divided into two sections. . Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology is a highly recommended advanced volume that will prove to be a relevant resource for professionals and postgraduate students in many evolutionary and palaeontological disciplines." Kris Kovarovic, PaleoAnthropology Society, 2009"In their preface, editors Sargis and Dagosto provide a fascinating overview of Fred's life and career, as well as a systematic analysis of his contributions to our science. This topical organization provides a kind of scaffold for the entire volume, as the editors tell us how each of the individual chapters fits into or contributes to these different themes. But the real accomplishment of the editors and the authors is that together, they have created a book that celebrates the scientific work of Fred Szalay by re-engaging with questions, issues, and problematic taxa that he himself worked on years or decades ago." R.L. Anemone, Journal of Mammalian Evolution, March 2010"The book itself contains 18 chapters . and spans the mammalian taxonomic and temporal spectrum from Early Cretaceous metatherians to extant primates. . the book chapters are . crisp, clear drawings, and photographic images. . there is an enormous amount of new data within its pages that will be essential for professionals and students in those fields. . this book stands as a great testament to both the man and his influential work." Gregg F. Gunnel, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2009"This book is a fine tribute to the work of Frederick Szalay, whose many seminal contributions to the field of mammalian evolutionary morphology span a wide range of issues. . Individual articles are well referenced and suitably illustrated with pertinent photographs, line drawings, tables, charts, and graphs. In addition to a general subject index, a taxonomic index is provided for ease in finding material on select taxa. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level graduate students, researchers, and professionals in evolutionary morphology, paleontology, and comparative anatomy." D. A. Brass, CHOICEce, Vol. 46 (4), December, 2008"This volume . is an extremely professional and well-produced book presenting up-to-date and cutting-edge research. . The book is divided into two sections. . Mammalian Evolutionary Morphology is a highly recommended advanced volume that will prove to be a relevant resource for professionals and postgraduate students in many evolutionary and palaeontological disciplines." Kris Kovarovic, PaleoAnthropology Society, 2009"In their preface, editors Sargis and Dagosto provide a fascinating overview of Fred's life and career, as well as a systematic analysis of his contributions to our science. This topical organization provides a kind of scaffold for the entire volume, as the editors tell us how each of the individual chapters fits into or contributes to these different themes. But the real accomplishment of the editors and the authors is that together, they have created a book that celebrates the scientific work of Fred Szalay by re-engaging with questions, issues, and problematic taxa that he himself worked on years or decades ago." R.L. Anemone, Journal of Mammalian Evolution, March 2010"The book itself contains 18 chapters . and spans the mammalian taxonomic and temporal spectrum from Early Cretaceous metatherians to extant primates. . the book chapters are . crisp, clear drawings, and photographic images. . there is an enormous amount of new data within its pages that will be essential for professionals and students in those fields. . this book stands as a great testament to both the man and his influential work." Gregg F. Gunnel, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2009"This book is a fine tribute to the work of Frederick Szalay, whose many seminal contributions to the field of mammalian evolutionary morphology span a wide range of issues. . Individual articles are well referenced and suitably illustrated with pertinent photographs, line drawings, tables, charts, and graphs. In addition to a general subject index, a taxonomic index is provided for ease in finding material on select taxa. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level graduate students, researchers, and professionals in evolutionary morphology, paleontology, and comparative anatomy." D. A. Brass, CHOICEce, Vol. 46 (4), December, 2008"A detailed preface and bibliography provides an interesting review of Szalay's contributions to the field, and of his philosophical approaches to the subject. The many papers on early primates make this volume essential reading for students of this group. . the work will also be of interest to those involved in the broader issues of mammalian functional morphology, descriptive anatomy, and phylogeny. It is an impressive volume, and a fitting tribute." (Darren Naish, Geological Magazine, Vol. 147 (5), 2010)