Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre Boundaries by Arden ReedManet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre Boundaries by Arden Reed

Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre Boundaries

byArden Reed

Hardcover | November 3, 2003

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This study combines art history and literary criticism in a joint study of the canonical "fathers" of modernism. Arden Reed argues that modernism is a matter of genre blending, hybridization and movements between text and image. Focusing on key works, Reed reveals how Manet and Flaubert actively mix and contaminate their work- Flaubert with images, Manet with narration. Reed extends the argument to the twentieth century, claiming we cannot understand twentieth century modernism while remaining locked within single disciplines.
Title:Manet, Flaubert, and the Emergence of Modernism: Blurring Genre BoundariesFormat:HardcoverPublished:November 3, 2003Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521815053

ISBN - 13:9780521815055

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Table of Contents

1. Framing Manet and Flaubert; 2. In and around '1866': Paris, Coubert, the salon of 1868; 3. The stain of modernism; 4. Canvassing the Jeune dame; 5. Allegory of beholding; 6. Stained glass: graphing Saint Julien; 7. Domestic stains: graphing Félicité.

Editorial Reviews

"This volume is beautiful in its appearance and interesting in its creation of a dialogue between Manet's and Flaubert's dialogic techniques. Through the analysis and comparison of a Manet painting and two Flaubert stories, Reed revises Greenberg's theory of modernism, which claims that painting and literature aim each to expel the other. Rather, Reed argues that Manet and Flaubert allow text and image to converse in their works...Reed's study is admirablyi nformed by prvious work on Flaubert and Manet, by theory, and by works' historical and cultural contexts." - Dorothy Kelly, Boston University