Mark's Gospel by John PainterMark's Gospel by John Painter

Mark's Gospel

byJohn PainterEditorJohn Painter

Paperback | May 23, 1997

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Mark's 'biography' of Jesus is the earliest of the four gospels, and influenced them all. The distinctive feature of this biography is the quality of 'good news', which presupposes a world dominated by the forces of evil.
John Painter shows how the rhetorical and dramatic shaping of the book emphasises the conflict of good and evil at many levels - between Jesus and the Jewish authorities, Jesus and the Roman authorities, and the conflict of values within the disciples themselves. These matters of content are integral to this original approach to Mark's theodicy, while the stylistic issue raises the question of Mark's intended readership.
John Painter's succinct yet thorough treatment of Mark's gospel opens up not only these rhetorical issues, but the social context of the gospel, which Painter argues to be that of the Pauline mission to the nations.
John Painter has taught New Testament Studies in England, South Africa and Australia. He is a member ofStudiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. His publications includeThe Quest for the Messiah(1991) andTheology as Hermeneutics(1987).
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Title:Mark's GospelFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.9 inPublished:May 23, 1997Publisher:Taylor and Francis

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415113652

ISBN - 13:9780415113656

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John Painter shows how the rhetorical and dramatic shaping of the book emphasise the conflict of good and evil at many levels: between Jesus and the Jewish authorities; Jesus and the Roman authorities; and the conflict of values within the disciples themselves. These matters of content are integral to this original approach to Mark's theodicy, while the stylistic issue raises the question of Mark's intended readership.