Martin Luther King, Jr.: Apostle Of Militant Nonviolence

Paperback | December 15, 1992

byJames A. Colaiaco

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In this exemplary work of scholarly synthesis the author traces the course of events from the emergence of Martin Luther King, Jr. as a national black spokesman during the Montgomery bus boycott to his radical critique of American society and foreign policy during the last years of his life. He also provides the first in-depth analysis of King's famous Letter from Birmingham Jail - a manifesto of the American civil rights movement and an eloquent defence of non-violent protest.

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From Our Editors

An assessment of the techniques, writings, and leadership of the civil rights leader explains how King's masterful use of the media drew national attention to nonviolent protest and exposed the brutality of racism. Reprint. K.

From the Publisher

In this exemplary work of scholarly synthesis the author traces the course of events from the emergence of Martin Luther King, Jr. as a national black spokesman during the Montgomery bus boycott to his radical critique of American society and foreign policy during the last years of his life. He also provides the first in-depth analysis...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:256 pages, 8.24 × 5.46 × 0.7 inPublished:December 15, 1992Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312088434

ISBN - 13:9780312088439

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements - Preface - Introduction to the Paperback Edition - Montgomery: Walking City: 1955-56 - Nonviolence Spreads in the South, 1957-61 - The Lessons of Albany, Georgia, 1961-62 - Birmingham and the March on Washington, 1963 - Interlude: King's Letter to America - The Struggle Continues, 1964 - Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 - Interlude: The Paradox of Nonviolence - A New Direction: Chicago, 1966 - King Takes a Radical Stand, 1967-68 - Epilogue - Notes - Bibliography - Index

From Our Editors

An assessment of the techniques, writings, and leadership of the civil rights leader explains how King's masterful use of the media drew national attention to nonviolent protest and exposed the brutality of racism. Reprint. K.