Masculinity and the Metropolis of Vice, 1550-1650

Hardcover | March 15, 2010

byAmanda Bailey, Roze Hentschell

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This volume offers a unique historical perspective on the ways that everyday life in early modern London both challenged and constituted manhood. Through the close examination of literary texts, primary sources, and the material artifacts of urbanity, leading authors in the field of early modern studies explore a range of bad behaviors--binge drinking at taverns, dicing at gaming houses, and procuring prostitutes at barbershops--in order to challenge the notion that a corrupt city ruined innocent young men. This collection shows that alternative modes of manhood radically revised the emotional, imaginative, and cultural geographies of London.

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This volume offers a unique historical perspective on the ways that everyday life in early modern London both challenged and constituted manhood. Through the close examination of literary texts, primary sources, and the material artifacts of urbanity, leading authors in the field of early modern studies explore a range of bad behaviors...

Amanda Bailey is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Flaunting: Style and the Subversive Male Body in Renaissance England. She has published essays on early modern male youth culture and the theater and more recently on early modern ideas of property and possession. Roze Hentschell is ...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:242 pages, 9.7 × 5.67 × 0.8 inPublished:March 15, 2010Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230623662

ISBN - 13:9780230623668

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Gendered Geographies of Vice--Amanda Bailey and Roze Hentschell * PART I: Redefining Urban Masculinity: Taverns, Universities, and Gaming Houses * Manly Drunkenness: Binge Drinking as Disciplined Play--Gina Bloom * University of Vice: Drink, Gentility, and Masculinity in Oxford, Cambridge, and London--Laurie Ellinghausen * The Social Stakes of Gambling in Early Modern London--Adam Zucker * PART II: Sexualizing the City: Cathedrals, Brothels, and Barbershops * Carnal Geographies: Mocking and Mapping the Religious Body--Mary Bly * “To what bawdy house doth your Maister belong?": Barbers, Bawds, and Vice in the Early Modern London Barbershop--Mark Albert Johnston * PART III: Remapping Misconduct: Sewers, Shops, and Streets * Coriolanus and "the rank-scented meinie": Smelling Rank in Early Modern London--Holly Dugan * Vicious Objects: Staging False Wares--Natasha Korda * City of Angels: Theatrical Vice and The Devil is an Ass--Ian Munro * Afterword: A Question of Morality--Lawrence Manley

Editorial Reviews

"Masculinity and the Metropolis of Vice, 1550-1650 offers a new account of the pleasures and dangers of early modern London. Instead of focusing on moralist diatribe, the essays collected here consider the mostly masculine culture of drinking, gaming, play-going, rioting, violence, and sex that shaped the urban subject in the century during which London's population and its geography expanded exponentially. By focusing on the social spaces in which vice took place - from the central aisle of St. Paul's to barbers' shops and bawdy houses, these essays draw on the work of cultural geographers as well as social historians to revise rigid patriarchal narratives and help us rethink early modern masculinity. A well-chosen collection useful for both teaching and research." - Karen Newman, Professor of English, New York University "The range of plays from which the authors draw their evidence is admirable, as are the connections they make to non-dramatic literature...Mary Bly, in one of the volume's standout essays, provides the best treatment I have encountered of the practices of space in St. Paul's Cathedral, and the cultural meanings of those practices." - Renaissance Quarterly