Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in India by Gauri ViswanathanMasks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in India by Gauri Viswanathan

Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in India

byGauri Viswanathan

Paperback | December 16, 2014

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A classic work in postcolonial studies, Masks of Conquest describes the introduction of English studies in India under British rule and illuminates the discipline's transcontinental movements and derivations, showing that the origins of English studies are as diverse and diffuse as its future shape. In her new preface, Gauri Viswanathan argues forcefully that the curricular study of English can no longer be understood innocently of or inattentively to the imperial contexts in which the discipline first articulated its mission.

Gauri Viswanathan is Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University. She is also the author of Outside the Fold: Conversion, Modernity, and Belief, which won the Harry Levin Prize awarded by the American Comparative Literature Association, the James Russell Lowell Prize awarded by the Modern Language Association of A...
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Title:Masks of Conquest: Literary Study and British Rule in IndiaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pagesPublished:December 16, 2014Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0231171692

ISBN - 13:9780231171694

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Table of Contents

Preface to the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary EditionAcknowledgmentsIntroduction1. The Beginnings of English Literary Study2. Praeparatio Evangelica3. "One Power, One Mind"4. Rewriting English5. Lessons of History6. The Failure of English7. Conclusion: Empire and the Western CanonNotesSelect BibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

A classic work in postcolonial studies, Masks of Conquest describes the introduction of English studies in India under British rule and illuminates the discipline's transcontinental movements and derivations, showing that the origins of English studies are as diverse and diffuse as its future shape. In her new preface, Gauri Viswanathan argues forcefully that the curricular study of English can no longer be understood innocently of or inattentively to the imperial contexts in which the discipline first articulated its mission. A compelling account of the relationship between power and culture and an indictment of the exploitative tendencies of ruling class interests.