Masters, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740-1790 by Robert OlwellMasters, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740-1790 by Robert Olwell

Masters, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740-1790

byRobert Olwell

Paperback | June 11, 1998

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The slave societies of the American colonies were quite different from the "Old South" of the early-nineteenth-century United States. In this engaging study of a colonial older South, Robert Olwell analyzes the structures and internal dynamics of a world in which both masters and slaves were also imperial subjects. While slavery was peculiar within a democratic republic, it was an integral and seldom questioned part of the eighteenth-century British empire.Olwell examines the complex relations among masters, slaves, metropolitan institutions, officials, and ideas in the South Carolina low country from the end of the Stono Rebellion through the chaos of the American Revolution. He details the interstices of power and resistance in four key sites of the colonial social order: the criminal law and the slave court; conversion and communion in the established church; market relations and the marketplace; and patriarchy and the plantation great house. Olwell shows how South Carolina's status as a colony influenced the development of slavery and also how the presence of slavery altered English ideas and institutions within a colonial setting. Masters, Slaves, and Subjects is a pathbreaking examination of the workings of American slavery within the context of America's colonial history.
Title:Masters, Slaves, and Subjects: The Culture of Power in the South Carolina Low Country, 1740-1790Format:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.34 inPublished:June 11, 1998Publisher:CORNELL UNIVERSITY PRESS

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:080148491X

ISBN - 13:9780801484919

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Table of Contents

Maps and Illustrations
Preface
Abbreviations

Introduction: Kings and Slaves
The Culture of Power
A Place with a Past

1. Between Rebellion and Revolution: Charles Town and the Low Country, 1740-1775
Cultivating the Land of Egypt
"Black and White all mix'd Together"
A Colonial Slave Society

2. Practical Justice: Slavery and the Criminal Law
Black Acts
Practical Justice
"To Speak the Real Truth"
The Rule of Law and the Law of Rule

3. Communion and Community: Slavery and the Established Church
The Church Established
"The Society of Christians"
The Kingdom of Heaven
Communion and Community

4. Mastering Money: Slavery and the Market
Agents of Property
The Wages of Slavery
"Loose, Idle and Disorderly"
The Law of the Market

5. Little Kingdoms: The Political Economy of the Plantations
The Profits of Patriarchy
The Ties That Bind
Plantation Justice
"A Reckoning of Accounts"

6. Revolutions Achieved and Denied: Charles Town and the Low Country, 1775-1782
Things Fall Apart, 3775-1776
"The King's people are coming!"
The Slaves' Home Front
End of Empire

Conclusion: Restorations
"Welcome the War Home"
"Slavery is our King"

Index

From Our Editors

While slavery was peculiar within a democratic republic, it was an integral and seldom questioned part of the 18th-century British empire. Examining the complex culture of the South Carolina law country from the end of the Stono Rebellion through the American Revolution, historian Robert Olwell analyzes the structures and internal dynamics of a world in which both masters and slaves were also imperial subjects.

Editorial Reviews

"Olwell blazes a new path by showing how South Carolina's colonial status influenced the development of slavery and how slavery altered or modified English institutions within a colonial setting. He considers four pillars of colonial society: the church, the law, the market, and patriarchy, and shows how each was peculiarly affected in a new environment in association with a strange institution that became normative."—Daniel C. Littlefield, author of Rice and Slaves: Ethnicity and the Slave Trade in South Carolina