Materials For Permanent Painting; A Manual For Manufacturers, Art Dealers, Artists And Collectors by Maximilian TochMaterials For Permanent Painting; A Manual For Manufacturers, Art Dealers, Artists And Collectors by Maximilian Toch

Materials For Permanent Painting; A Manual For Manufacturers, Art Dealers, Artists And Collectors

byMaximilian Toch

Paperback | January 12, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1911. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XVIII WATER IN TUBE COLORS UNDER normal conditions, if you take heavy pigments like white lead, oxide of iron, etc., and grind them in linseed or poppy oil, the oil will eventually float to the top and the pigment will settle hard to the bottom, yet nearly all the tube colors remain soft and fresh, and apparently the law of gravity is overcome in some way. A large number of the colors are kept in suspension because the manufacturer adds water to the oil, and makes an emulsion which keeps the pigment suspended. This is particularly true of the whites, and it must be admitted that a small percentage of water added to the pigment or the oil during the process of manfacture does not do any ultimate harm, yet, some tube manufacturers use such an excessive quantity of water that where paint is very smoothly applied the water evaporates quite rapidly and leaves the subsequent film in a spongy, porous condition. If a picture were to be put away in a perfectly clean atmosphere free from dust no harm would result, or if the precaution were taken to place a sheet of glass over the picture and slightly away from it, the picture would dry in High poster photo-micrograph of Flake White which contains too much water in its composition. The uneven surface presents an excellent lodging place for (hist and dirt rallied are hard to remove. a perfectly clean condition, and would remain so until it were varnished; but this is not the case, so that if we examine microscopically a paint film which contains excessive water, we find that the spongy, porous condition of the surface is a lodging place for dust and dirt which cannot be readily removed for obvious physical reasons, and as it seems advisable to add water to nearly all of the tube colors which will settle out rapidly ...
Title:Materials For Permanent Painting; A Manual For Manufacturers, Art Dealers, Artists And CollectorsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:50 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.1 inPublished:January 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021723304X

ISBN - 13:9780217233040

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