Means and Ends: The Idea of Capital in the West, 1500-1970

Hardcover | November 15, 2008

byFrancesco Boldizzoni

not yet rated|write a review
Capital has dominated the imagination of Western society from the Industrial Revolution. Means and Ends offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise, evolution and crisis of this concept from the sixteenth century to the modern day. Based on a wealth of primary sources it offers an exciting study of intellectual and cultural history.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$162.48 online
$162.50 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Capital has dominated the imagination of Western society from the Industrial Revolution. Means and Ends offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise, evolution and crisis of this concept from the sixteenth century to the modern day. Based on a wealth of primary sources it offers an exciting study of intellectual and cultur...

FRANCESCO BOLDIZZONI is a Fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge and a Research Officer at the Institute of Economic History, Bocconi University, Milan.

other books by Francesco Boldizzoni

The Poverty of Clio: Resurrecting Economic History
The Poverty of Clio: Resurrecting Economic History

Kobo ebook|Jul 5 2011

$48.49 online$62.93list price(save 22%)
Format:HardcoverDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.56 inPublished:November 15, 2008Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:023057257X

ISBN - 13:9780230572577

Customer Reviews of Means and Ends: The Idea of Capital in the West, 1500-1970

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction  
Capital as Money: The Emergence of Modernity
Land and Labour 1650-1800
Reproduction and Transition
Industrial Maturity
The Revolt of 1867
The Atlantic Reaction
The Continent 1870-1938
Keynes and After: Crisis and Continuity

Editorial Reviews

“Using exemplary figures to trace out a long and complicated history of ideas, this book admirably achieves its main goal, which is “to put economic ideas into the context of the history of facts”. Given the scope of the endeavor and the brevity of the book, the discussion remains surprisingly accessible, clear, and concise.” -- Warren Breckman, American Historical Review