Mechanism and the Novel: Science in the Narrative Process by Martha A. TurnerMechanism and the Novel: Science in the Narrative Process by Martha A. Turner

Mechanism and the Novel: Science in the Narrative Process

byMartha A. Turner

Paperback | February 19, 2009

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Martha Turner's book makes an important contribution to the growing studies of science and literature by examining the relationship between British fiction and the tradition of mechanistic science derived from Isaac Newton. It traces the evolution of the concept of mechanism among science writers and novelists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and undertakes detailed analysis of novels by Austen, Scott, Dickens, Meredith, Conrad, Lawrence, and Doris Lessing. The book provides a bridge between the mechanical philosophy of the eighteenth century and present-day habits of thought.
Title:Mechanism and the Novel: Science in the Narrative ProcessFormat:PaperbackDimensions:212 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.47 inPublished:February 19, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521108969

ISBN - 13:9780521108966

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. The concept of mechanism; 2. The Aristotelian logic of settlement in Austen's Pride and Prejudice; 3. Scott's The Bride of Lammermoor: empiricism, mechanism, imagination; 4. Cosmology and chaos in Dickens's Bleak House; 5. Scientific humanism and the comic spirit: from The Ordeal of Richard Feverel to The Egoist; 6. Old mindsets and new world-music in Conrad's The Secret Agent; 7. Women in Love: beyond fulfilment; 8. The mechanistic legacy: Lessing's Canopus in Argos: archives.

Editorial Reviews

"Turner's book is enjoyable to read, and offers many useful, thought-provoking readings of texts..." Victorian Studies