Medieval Listening and Reading: The Primary Reception of German Literature 800-1300 by Dennis Howard GreenMedieval Listening and Reading: The Primary Reception of German Literature 800-1300 by Dennis Howard Green

Medieval Listening and Reading: The Primary Reception of German Literature 800-1300

byDennis Howard Green, D. H. Green

Paperback | October 6, 2005

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This book deals with the first 500 years of German literature (800-1300) and how it was received by contemporaries. Covering the whole spectrum of genres, from dance-songs to liturgy, heroic epics to drama, it explores which works were meant to be recited to listeners, which were destined for the individual reader, and which anticipated a twofold reception. It emphasizes this third possibility, seeing it as an example of the bicultural world of the Middle Ages, combining orality with writing, illiteracy with literacy, vernacular with Latin, lay with clerical.
Title:Medieval Listening and Reading: The Primary Reception of German Literature 800-1300Format:PaperbackDimensions:500 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 1.1 inPublished:October 6, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521020883

ISBN - 13:9780521020886

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Table of Contents

Part I. Preliminary Problems: 1. Orality and writing; 2. The historical background; Part II. Three Modes of Reception: 3. Criteria for reception by hearing; 4. Survey of reception by hearing; 5. Criteria for reception by reading; 6. Survey of reception by reading; 7. Criteria for the intermediate mode of reception; 8. Survey of the intermediate mode of reception; Part III. Conclusions: 9. Literacy, history and fiction; 10. Recital and reading in their historical context; Notes; Bibliographic index.

Editorial Reviews

"Green's book will be useful to scholars, college instructors, and graduate students not conversant in modern German who seek an informed discussion of questions and sources central to orality and literacy in the German Middle Ages." Speculum